Programme 2021

Programme
Friday, 26 February 2021

Political philosophy, climate change, fantasy, historical fiction, book launches & more...

26 Feb | 09:00 AM - 09:40 AM
Front Lawn

Morning Music: HARPREET

Harpreet is a versatile artiste who sings original musical compositions in Hindi, as well as in Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese, Rajasthani and Haryanvi. Trained in Hindustani classical music, he plays both the guitar and flute. His talent fuses both the modern and traditional when composing tunes to his own lyrics and for classical poetry that he loves. He is best known for creating musical scores to the works of poets such as Kabir and Bulleh Shah. His original composition Kutte (dog), a song about a canine’s view of human life, was selected by Bollywood film director Dibakar Banerjee and Kanu Behl for the film Titli. Some of his yet-to be-released compositions, Geet Aur Shabd, Kho Gaye He Wo and Sonapani, have received wide appreciation.

26 Feb | 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Front Lawn

These are dangerous times for democracy. In his new book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?, renowned philosopher Michael Sandel shows how the polarised politics of our time reflects the deep divide between winners and losers. He argues that we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalisation and rising inequality. In conversation with celebrated author and Member of Parliament Shashi Tharoor, Sandel offers an ethic of dignity and solidarity that points the way to a new politics of the common good.
 

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM
Front Lawn

“It’s easy to feel powerless in the face of a problem as big as climate change. But you’re not powerless. And you don’t have to be a politician or a philanthropist to make a difference.” – Bill Gates

In conversation with Alok Sharma, President of the COP26 Climate Conference and former Secretary of State for Business, Bill Gates will set out a wide-ranging, practical—and accessible—plan for how the world can get to zero greenhouse gas emissions in time to avoid a climate catastrophe. Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide toward certain environmental disasters. He will explain not only why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal. 

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM
Durbar Hall

The House of Jaipur has all the ingredients necessary to define a legend: exquisite maharanis, handsome maharajahs on horseback, conspicuous wealth and what they call homes the rest of us call palaces. John Zubrzycki's latest book on this royal household goes behind sealed doors to unearth more untold stories, and also to set the vanishing phenomena of centuries old feudal life styles against the reality of post Independence modern democratic India. Zubrzycki is the author of books such as The Last Nizam: The Rise and Fall of India's Greatest Princely State,  The Mysterious Mr Jacob: Diamond Merchant, Magician and Spy and Jadoowallahs, Jugglers and Jinns: A Magical History of India. Archaeologist, historian and author Rima Hooja’s latest book is Maharana Pratap : The Invincible Warrior. In conversation with Sanjoy K. Roy, he introduces us to the fascinating inner world of the Royals.
 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM
Front Lawn

Our knowledge and information of the Aztec empire, their history and their conquest, for generations has been informed by the western pen. Author and historian Camilla Townsend’s Cundill History Prize winning Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs brings to light a complex and riveting history of the Aztecs based entirely on direct translations of the annals written in the neglected Nahuatl language. Townsend is the Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her other books include Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive. Peter Frankopan, Professor of Global History at Oxford University, is the author of The Silk Roads: A New History of the World and The News Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World. In conversation with Frankopan, she explores the precarious survival and brutal conquest of the people of the sun and their journey of endurance.
 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM
Durbar Hall

“The Taj Mahal rises above the banks of the river like a solitary tear suspended on the cheek of time.” -Rabindranath Tagore
 
The Taj Mahal is integral to Agra’s identity, history and economy. It is a focal point of the city’s profound Mughal legacy , which reflects in every aspect of its folk arts and heritage. It has become emblematic of romantic love and aesthetic beauty. Yet, this dream-like marble mausoleum faces potential damage from environmental pollution as well as cultural hostility by a segment of ultra nationalists. An absorbing session with Amita Baig, Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, Tripurdaman Singh and Sarthak Malhotra on the multi-faceted narratives of the Taj Mahal, its vital importance for India's tourism and its abiding place in the human imagination as a symbol of eternal love.
 
Amita Baig is the Executive Director of World Monuments Fund India. Her books include Taj Mahal: Multiple Narratives. Tripurdaman Singh is a British Academy postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. Singh's latest book is Sixteen Stormy Days: The Story of the First Amendment of the Constitution of India. Sarthak Malhotra is an anthropologist and research scholar at the University of Cambridge. 
 

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
Front Lawn

Keshav Desiraju’s book, Of Gifted Voice: The Life and Art of MS Subbulakshmi, brings a new perspective to the most famous vocalist of Carnatic music. With access to less known information about her personal life, and seeing this in conjunction with the finesse  of her performances, the author hopes to correct some assumptions  about ‘MS’ the person and her command over a vast repertoire of compositions. Known to be a philanthropist and a woman of exquisite style, MS’s devotional music has enthralled generations of listeners. Jawaharlal Nehru called her the ‘Queen of  Music’ and adoring audiences thronged to her concerts. Writer and broadcast journalist Mrinal Pande is the former chairperson of Prasar Bharati. Writer and journalist Samanth Subramanian most recent book is A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of J.B.S. Haldane. In conversation with Pande and Subramanian, Desiraju places MS Subbulakshmi’s achievements in the larger context of the advent of film, radio and gramophone which dramatically altered the music industry. 
The book will be launched at this session during the Jaipur Literature Festival 2021.  

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
Durbar Hall

Senior journalist and columnist Anant Vijay delves into the roots of a historic victory and defeat at Amethi where Smriti Irani wrested this key parliamentary seat from the incumbent Rahul Gandhi, in 2019. He examines the behind-the-scenes struggles and battles, the excitement and high tension, the interplay of local and national interests in this real life political thriller.

The author will be in conversation with Kanchan Gupta

26 Feb | 02:00 PM - 02:45 PM
Front Lawn

 

A master of expression and text, award-winning Irish writer Colm Tóibín possesses a unique ability to inhabit and blend through his words an expansive universe of fiction, nonfiction and poetry. He is the bestselling author of The Master, The Blackwater Lightship,  The Testament of Mary and Nora Webster. His upcoming book is The Magician. In conversation with Nandini Nair, Tóibín takes us through the rhythm and roots of his writing process and celebrated career.


 

26 Feb | 2:00 PM - 02:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Scholar and author Daniel Simpson’s recent book The Truth of Yoga takes us on a journey through the origins, development and concept of Yoga. Cutting through myth and misinformation, the text provides a comprehensive overview of this age-old discipline which is celebrated worldwide for its mental, physical and spiritual benefits. Simpson teaches courses on yoga philosophy at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and at Triyoga in London. He draws on his experience as a journalist to make the subject accessible. Yoga practitioner and teacher Ranju Roy is the co-author ofEmbodying the Yoga Sūtra: Support, Direction, Space and teaches courses on the practice and philosophy of yoga. In conversation with Roy, Simpson delves into the past, present and future of this ancient tradition.
 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM
Front Lawn

Anish Kapoor has succeeded in transforming the cool, conceptual, and minimal approach to sculpture by adding lyricism, metaphor, and the heat of the primordial. Objects spill out from their own parameters, yet they also stand serenely as in meditative focus as if for ritual. Typically, the sculptures appear abstract, with Kapoor's intention to promote self-reflection made most obvious when using mirrored surfaces. He does not wish to present a prescriptive idea, but instead to create an environment within which people themselves can consider meaning. As the viewer becomes part of the sculpture, each work speaks of the confined individuality of a single body, but also of the expansive inclusiveness of a shared place. His sculptures paradoxically entwine esoteric philosophy with sensual everyday experience. In this session, one of India’s greatest artists talks about his life and work with his friend Homi K. Bhabha.
 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Journalist and writer George Packer’s Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century is an enduring account of the force behind the Dayton Accords which famously ended the Balkan wars. Packer’s sweeping diplomatic history is based on Holbrooke's diaries and papers and gives a peek into the life of man both equally admired and detested. Packer’s other works include The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq and Blood of the Liberals. In conversation with journalist and writer Basharat Peer, Packer dives into the life and career of an extraordinary and deeply flawed man and the political and social circles he inhabited.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM
Front Lawn

Meelis Friedenthal’s historical novel Mesilased: The Bees is based in Estonia of the 17th century. Using a fabulist technique the author explores philosophy and science as twin factors influencing the hero, Laurentius, who,accompanied  by  his parrot  Clodia, travels to Tartu.  The Estonian city, famed as the abode of the Muses, turns out to be a place of destitution and disease. While Laurentius submits to various treatments for his bodily and mental illnesses, he faints and begins to see an enchanting bee-like maiden in his hallucinatory condition.  The novel melts the boundaries between history and speculation, creating a fascinating discussion on the perception of reality. In conversation with Meelis Friedenthal is academic and writer Malashri Lal. Lal’s recent book is Betrayed By Hope: A Play On The Life Of Michael Madhusudan Dutt.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM
Durbar Hall

A world still reeling from the impact of the COVID19 pandemic has also seen a silver lining in the situation - a paradigm shift to an evolving digital space for artisans and craftsmen that is replete with creative possibilities. A panel that discusses and analyses the efforts on becoming an Atmanirbhar Bharat with the revitalised focus on local crafts, heirloom products, sustainable consumption with an emphasis on ecological and social impact while driving revenues.

 


 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM
Front Lawn

The pandemic has provided many parts of the planet a reprieve from the worst effects of pollution, demonstrating that the problem has solutions and is at least partially reversible. It has also served as a potent reminder that burning of fossil fuels is no longer feasible because the severe consequences and alternative measures are imperative for the survival of our planet. An important session that looks at the human cost of air pollution, be it natural or man made, and the possibility of change. Jyoti Pande Lavakare is a journalist, columnist and author of Breathing Here Is Injurious to Your Health: The Human Cost of Air Pollution and How You Can Be the Change. Academic and author Alastair Lewis is a Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the University of York and a Science Director at the National Centre for Atmospheric Science. Siddharth Singh is an energy, mobility and climate policy expert. He was selected to be a German Chancellor Fellow in 2016-17 and is the author of The Great Smog of India. In conversation with Anumita Roychowdhury, the Executive Director, Research and Advocacy, Centre For Science and Environment, they look at solutions for clean air, and discuss the potential for innovative political, economic and social reform that need to be addressed to make a credible impact on emissions and the quality and value of human life.
 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Marina Wheeler opens the portals of memory as the daughter of a woman traumatised by the Partition of 1947 that divided British India into Pakistan and India. The Lost Homestead: My Mother, Partition and the Punjab tracks a parallel story of the dreams of nation building in India and also a displaced woman’s struggle to find economic and social space in her new habitat. Wheeler follows her mother's buried past, her marriage and move to England where she refuses to look over her shoulder at a lost world. Wheeler is a Queen’s Counsel in England.  Author and diplomat Navtej Sarna’s books include The Book of Nanak,  Savage Harvest (a translation of partition stories of MS Sarna) and The Exile: A Novel Based on the Life of Maharaja Duleep Singh. He is the former High Commissioner of India to the United Kingdom. In conversation with Sarna, she explores the meaning of Punjab Sikh identity as it survives through cultural transitions.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM
Front Lawn

Academic and author Richard M. Eaton’s book India in the Persianate Age is a diverse and rich account of the Indian subcontinent’s interaction with cultures and people across the world through the centuries. Focusing on the introduction of Persianate culture into the region, the book explores the assimilation and integration of the traditions with India’s Sanskritic cultures and into the fabric of our language, art, architecture, literature, cuisine, and more. Eaton is the Professor of History at the University of Arizona. His other books include A Social History Of The Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives and Essays on Islam and Indian History. In conversation with author and Festival Co Director William Dalrymple, Eaton takes us on a journey through the influences and traditions that made India establish its diverse cultural roots.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Enter Stage Right: The Alkazi-Padamsee Family Memoir is a heartfelt homage to one of the greatest alliances in the world of theatre and art in post-Independence India: the Alkazi-Padamsees. Penned by noted director Feisal Alkazi, son of the late theatre veteran and Director of the National School of Drama Ebrahim Alkazi, and Roshen Alkazi, pioneering costumier and founder-director of Art Heritage, the memoir charmingly recounts the stories and anecdotes that constitute the history of Indian theatre, bringing them to life with insightful observations and more than 50 archival photographs. In this memorable session, he speaks to Quasar Thakore Padamsee to discuss the institutional legacy of their family and how they shaped the future of arts in India. In conversation with festival producer Sanjoy K Roy.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM
Front Lawn

“India lives in her villages,” said Gandhi. Although agriculture is the most important sector of the economy, accounting for close to 16 %of the GDP and providing employment to much of the nation's workforce, rural-urban distances and divides continue to grow. The incomprehension between those who contribute to growing our food and those who consume it widens by the day. All political parties claim to represent the farmer but the tiller of the soil is mute and invisible in the process of decision making. Climate change further impacts the uncertainties that farmers face. An engaged panel speaks of the paradoxes of policy and the complex issues involved in bringing about much-needed reforms and discusses the signposts ahead. Kota Neelima is an Indian author, researcher, artist and political commentator, specialising in rural distress, gender and her work focuses on the condition of women farmers, farmer suicides and peripheries of democratic societies. Economist, author and columnist Surjit Bhalla is currently the Executive Director for India at the International Monetary Fund. Dushyant Dave is a senior advocate and former president of the Supreme Court Bar Association. Sanket Upadhyay is an anchor and Executive editor at NDTV.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM
Durbar Hall

“If we want to put people first, we have to know what matters to them, what improves their well-being, and how we can supply more of whatever that is.” —Joseph E. Stiglitz

 

A thought-provoking and critical look into society's measure of prosperity, Measuring What Counts: The Global Movement for Well-Being, co-authored by Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz, charts the global movement of the past decade and questions the idea of the Gross Domestic Product or GDP. Calling for a new criteria of judgment, the book examines factors such as inequality, economic vulnerability and environmental sustainability and its impact on the population and its overall idea of success. In this session, Stiglitz delves on the fundamental question of how we measure our lives and presents a new path ahead.  In conversation with entrepreneur and investor Mohit Satyanand.


 

26 Feb | 08:00 PM
Front Lawn

After Junun where Shye Ben Tzur collaborated with numerous musicians from Rajasthan, India and Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, Ben Tzur initiates a live experimental voyage where all the beats and compositions are recreated live. Ben Tzur’s previous work Junun with Jonny Greenwood was recorded and mixed by Nigel Goodrich in a 15th century Fort in Jodhpur, India.Junun was also documented by Paul Thomas Anderson into a film by the same title. Besides playing independent concerts and performing in Festivals, Junun has supported Radiohead’s tours  in Europe, Israel, South and North America. His new project is aLive music solo performance with devotional poetries filmed and recorded in the Augusta Victoria Church and on the outskirts of Jerusalem’s sacred landscape. Halel is a 43 min artistic journey moving from meditation to  ecstasy.

26 Feb | 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Front Lawn

75. Keynote Session: The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?

Michael Sandel in conversation with Shashi Tharoor

Session Presented By Business Standard

These are dangerous times for democracy. In his new book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?, renowned philosopher Michael Sandel shows how the polarised politics of our time reflects the deep divide between winners and losers. He argues that we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalisation and rising inequality. In conversation with celebrated author and Member of Parliament Shashi Tharoor, Sandel offers an ethic of dignity and solidarity that points the way to a new politics of the common good.
 

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM
Front Lawn

“It’s easy to feel powerless in the face of a problem as big as climate change. But you’re not powerless. And you don’t have to be a politician or a philanthropist to make a difference.” – Bill Gates

In conversation with Alok Sharma, President of the COP26 Climate Conference and former Secretary of State for Business, Bill Gates will set out a wide-ranging, practical—and accessible—plan for how the world can get to zero greenhouse gas emissions in time to avoid a climate catastrophe. Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide toward certain environmental disasters. He will explain not only why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal. 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM
Front Lawn

Our knowledge and information of the Aztec empire, their history and their conquest, for generations has been informed by the western pen. Author and historian Camilla Townsend’s Cundill History Prize winning Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs brings to light a complex and riveting history of the Aztecs based entirely on direct translations of the annals written in the neglected Nahuatl language. Townsend is the Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her other books include Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive. Peter Frankopan, Professor of Global History at Oxford University, is the author of The Silk Roads: A New History of the World and The News Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World. In conversation with Frankopan, she explores the precarious survival and brutal conquest of the people of the sun and their journey of endurance.
 

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
Front Lawn

Keshav Desiraju’s book, Of Gifted Voice: The Life and Art of MS Subbulakshmi, brings a new perspective to the most famous vocalist of Carnatic music. With access to less known information about her personal life, and seeing this in conjunction with the finesse  of her performances, the author hopes to correct some assumptions  about ‘MS’ the person and her command over a vast repertoire of compositions. Known to be a philanthropist and a woman of exquisite style, MS’s devotional music has enthralled generations of listeners. Jawaharlal Nehru called her the ‘Queen of  Music’ and adoring audiences thronged to her concerts. Writer and broadcast journalist Mrinal Pande is the former chairperson of Prasar Bharati. Writer and journalist Samanth Subramanian most recent book is A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of J.B.S. Haldane. In conversation with Pande and Subramanian, Desiraju places MS Subbulakshmi’s achievements in the larger context of the advent of film, radio and gramophone which dramatically altered the music industry. 
The book will be launched at this session during the Jaipur Literature Festival 2021.  

26 Feb | 02:00 PM - 02:45 PM
Front Lawn

 

A master of expression and text, award-winning Irish writer Colm Tóibín possesses a unique ability to inhabit and blend through his words an expansive universe of fiction, nonfiction and poetry. He is the bestselling author of The Master, The Blackwater Lightship,  The Testament of Mary and Nora Webster. His upcoming book is The Magician. In conversation with Nandini Nair, Tóibín takes us through the rhythm and roots of his writing process and celebrated career.


 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM
Front Lawn

Anish Kapoor has succeeded in transforming the cool, conceptual, and minimal approach to sculpture by adding lyricism, metaphor, and the heat of the primordial. Objects spill out from their own parameters, yet they also stand serenely as in meditative focus as if for ritual. Typically, the sculptures appear abstract, with Kapoor's intention to promote self-reflection made most obvious when using mirrored surfaces. He does not wish to present a prescriptive idea, but instead to create an environment within which people themselves can consider meaning. As the viewer becomes part of the sculpture, each work speaks of the confined individuality of a single body, but also of the expansive inclusiveness of a shared place. His sculptures paradoxically entwine esoteric philosophy with sensual everyday experience. In this session, one of India’s greatest artists talks about his life and work with his friend Homi K. Bhabha.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM
Front Lawn

Meelis Friedenthal’s historical novel Mesilased: The Bees is based in Estonia of the 17th century. Using a fabulist technique the author explores philosophy and science as twin factors influencing the hero, Laurentius, who,accompanied  by  his parrot  Clodia, travels to Tartu.  The Estonian city, famed as the abode of the Muses, turns out to be a place of destitution and disease. While Laurentius submits to various treatments for his bodily and mental illnesses, he faints and begins to see an enchanting bee-like maiden in his hallucinatory condition.  The novel melts the boundaries between history and speculation, creating a fascinating discussion on the perception of reality. In conversation with Meelis Friedenthal is academic and writer Malashri Lal. Lal’s recent book is Betrayed By Hope: A Play On The Life Of Michael Madhusudan Dutt.
 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM
Front Lawn

The pandemic has provided many parts of the planet a reprieve from the worst effects of pollution, demonstrating that the problem has solutions and is at least partially reversible. It has also served as a potent reminder that burning of fossil fuels is no longer feasible because the severe consequences and alternative measures are imperative for the survival of our planet. An important session that looks at the human cost of air pollution, be it natural or man made, and the possibility of change. Jyoti Pande Lavakare is a journalist, columnist and author of Breathing Here Is Injurious to Your Health: The Human Cost of Air Pollution and How You Can Be the Change. Academic and author Alastair Lewis is a Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the University of York and a Science Director at the National Centre for Atmospheric Science. Siddharth Singh is an energy, mobility and climate policy expert. He was selected to be a German Chancellor Fellow in 2016-17 and is the author of The Great Smog of India. In conversation with Anumita Roychowdhury, the Executive Director, Research and Advocacy, Centre For Science and Environment, they look at solutions for clean air, and discuss the potential for innovative political, economic and social reform that need to be addressed to make a credible impact on emissions and the quality and value of human life.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM
Front Lawn

Academic and author Richard M. Eaton’s book India in the Persianate Age is a diverse and rich account of the Indian subcontinent’s interaction with cultures and people across the world through the centuries. Focusing on the introduction of Persianate culture into the region, the book explores the assimilation and integration of the traditions with India’s Sanskritic cultures and into the fabric of our language, art, architecture, literature, cuisine, and more. Eaton is the Professor of History at the University of Arizona. His other books include A Social History Of The Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives and Essays on Islam and Indian History. In conversation with author and Festival Co Director William Dalrymple, Eaton takes us on a journey through the influences and traditions that made India establish its diverse cultural roots.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM
Front Lawn

“India lives in her villages,” said Gandhi. Although agriculture is the most important sector of the economy, accounting for close to 16 %of the GDP and providing employment to much of the nation's workforce, rural-urban distances and divides continue to grow. The incomprehension between those who contribute to growing our food and those who consume it widens by the day. All political parties claim to represent the farmer but the tiller of the soil is mute and invisible in the process of decision making. Climate change further impacts the uncertainties that farmers face. An engaged panel speaks of the paradoxes of policy and the complex issues involved in bringing about much-needed reforms and discusses the signposts ahead. Kota Neelima is an Indian author, researcher, artist and political commentator, specialising in rural distress, gender and her work focuses on the condition of women farmers, farmer suicides and peripheries of democratic societies. Economist, author and columnist Surjit Bhalla is currently the Executive Director for India at the International Monetary Fund. Dushyant Dave is a senior advocate and former president of the Supreme Court Bar Association. Sanket Upadhyay is an anchor and Executive editor at NDTV.
 

26 Feb | 08:00 PM
Front Lawn

After Junun where Shye Ben Tzur collaborated with numerous musicians from Rajasthan, India and Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, Ben Tzur initiates a live experimental voyage where all the beats and compositions are recreated live. Ben Tzur’s previous work Junun with Jonny Greenwood was recorded and mixed by Nigel Goodrich in a 15th century Fort in Jodhpur, India.Junun was also documented by Paul Thomas Anderson into a film by the same title. Besides playing independent concerts and performing in Festivals, Junun has supported Radiohead’s tours  in Europe, Israel, South and North America. His new project is aLive music solo performance with devotional poetries filmed and recorded in the Augusta Victoria Church and on the outskirts of Jerusalem’s sacred landscape. Halel is a 43 min artistic journey moving from meditation to  ecstasy.

26 Feb | 09:00 AM - 09:40 AM
Front Lawn

Harpreet is a versatile artiste who sings original musical compositions in Hindi, as well as in Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese, Rajasthani and Haryanvi. Trained in Hindustani classical music, he plays both the guitar and flute. His talent fuses both the modern and traditional when composing tunes to his own lyrics and for classical poetry that he loves. He is best known for creating musical scores to the works of poets such as Kabir and Bulleh Shah. His original composition Kutte (dog), a song about a canine’s view of human life, was selected by Bollywood film director Dibakar Banerjee and Kanu Behl for the film Titli. Some of his yet-to be-released compositions, Geet Aur Shabd, Kho Gaye He Wo and Sonapani, have received wide appreciation.

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM
Durbar Hall

77. The House of Jaipur

John Zubrzycki and Rima Hooja in conversation with Sanjoy K. Roy, , introduced by H.E. Barry O' Farrell

Session Partner Australian High Commission, New Delhi

The House of Jaipur has all the ingredients necessary to define a legend: exquisite maharanis, handsome maharajahs on horseback, conspicuous wealth and what they call homes the rest of us call palaces. John Zubrzycki's latest book on this royal household goes behind sealed doors to unearth more untold stories, and also to set the vanishing phenomena of centuries old feudal life styles against the reality of post Independence modern democratic India. Zubrzycki is the author of books such as The Last Nizam: The Rise and Fall of India's Greatest Princely State,  The Mysterious Mr Jacob: Diamond Merchant, Magician and Spy and Jadoowallahs, Jugglers and Jinns: A Magical History of India. Archaeologist, historian and author Rima Hooja’s latest book is Maharana Pratap : The Invincible Warrior. In conversation with Sanjoy K. Roy, he introduces us to the fascinating inner world of the Royals.
 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM
Durbar Hall

“The Taj Mahal rises above the banks of the river like a solitary tear suspended on the cheek of time.” -Rabindranath Tagore
 
The Taj Mahal is integral to Agra’s identity, history and economy. It is a focal point of the city’s profound Mughal legacy , which reflects in every aspect of its folk arts and heritage. It has become emblematic of romantic love and aesthetic beauty. Yet, this dream-like marble mausoleum faces potential damage from environmental pollution as well as cultural hostility by a segment of ultra nationalists. An absorbing session with Amita Baig, Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, Tripurdaman Singh and Sarthak Malhotra on the multi-faceted narratives of the Taj Mahal, its vital importance for India's tourism and its abiding place in the human imagination as a symbol of eternal love.
 
Amita Baig is the Executive Director of World Monuments Fund India. Her books include Taj Mahal: Multiple Narratives. Tripurdaman Singh is a British Academy postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. Singh's latest book is Sixteen Stormy Days: The Story of the First Amendment of the Constitution of India. Sarthak Malhotra is an anthropologist and research scholar at the University of Cambridge. 
 

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
Durbar Hall

Senior journalist and columnist Anant Vijay delves into the roots of a historic victory and defeat at Amethi where Smriti Irani wrested this key parliamentary seat from the incumbent Rahul Gandhi, in 2019. He examines the behind-the-scenes struggles and battles, the excitement and high tension, the interplay of local and national interests in this real life political thriller.

The author will be in conversation with Kanchan Gupta

26 Feb | 2:00 PM - 02:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Scholar and author Daniel Simpson’s recent book The Truth of Yoga takes us on a journey through the origins, development and concept of Yoga. Cutting through myth and misinformation, the text provides a comprehensive overview of this age-old discipline which is celebrated worldwide for its mental, physical and spiritual benefits. Simpson teaches courses on yoga philosophy at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and at Triyoga in London. He draws on his experience as a journalist to make the subject accessible. Yoga practitioner and teacher Ranju Roy is the co-author ofEmbodying the Yoga Sūtra: Support, Direction, Space and teaches courses on the practice and philosophy of yoga. In conversation with Roy, Simpson delves into the past, present and future of this ancient tradition.
 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Journalist and writer George Packer’s Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century is an enduring account of the force behind the Dayton Accords which famously ended the Balkan wars. Packer’s sweeping diplomatic history is based on Holbrooke's diaries and papers and gives a peek into the life of man both equally admired and detested. Packer’s other works include The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq and Blood of the Liberals. In conversation with journalist and writer Basharat Peer, Packer dives into the life and career of an extraordinary and deeply flawed man and the political and social circles he inhabited.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM
Durbar Hall

A world still reeling from the impact of the COVID19 pandemic has also seen a silver lining in the situation - a paradigm shift to an evolving digital space for artisans and craftsmen that is replete with creative possibilities. A panel that discusses and analyses the efforts on becoming an Atmanirbhar Bharat with the revitalised focus on local crafts, heirloom products, sustainable consumption with an emphasis on ecological and social impact while driving revenues.

 


 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Marina Wheeler opens the portals of memory as the daughter of a woman traumatised by the Partition of 1947 that divided British India into Pakistan and India. The Lost Homestead: My Mother, Partition and the Punjab tracks a parallel story of the dreams of nation building in India and also a displaced woman’s struggle to find economic and social space in her new habitat. Wheeler follows her mother's buried past, her marriage and move to England where she refuses to look over her shoulder at a lost world. Wheeler is a Queen’s Counsel in England.  Author and diplomat Navtej Sarna’s books include The Book of Nanak,  Savage Harvest (a translation of partition stories of MS Sarna) and The Exile: A Novel Based on the Life of Maharaja Duleep Singh. He is the former High Commissioner of India to the United Kingdom. In conversation with Sarna, she explores the meaning of Punjab Sikh identity as it survives through cultural transitions.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM
Durbar Hall

Enter Stage Right: The Alkazi-Padamsee Family Memoir is a heartfelt homage to one of the greatest alliances in the world of theatre and art in post-Independence India: the Alkazi-Padamsees. Penned by noted director Feisal Alkazi, son of the late theatre veteran and Director of the National School of Drama Ebrahim Alkazi, and Roshen Alkazi, pioneering costumier and founder-director of Art Heritage, the memoir charmingly recounts the stories and anecdotes that constitute the history of Indian theatre, bringing them to life with insightful observations and more than 50 archival photographs. In this memorable session, he speaks to Quasar Thakore Padamsee to discuss the institutional legacy of their family and how they shaped the future of arts in India. In conversation with festival producer Sanjoy K Roy.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM
Durbar Hall

“If we want to put people first, we have to know what matters to them, what improves their well-being, and how we can supply more of whatever that is.” —Joseph E. Stiglitz

 

A thought-provoking and critical look into society's measure of prosperity, Measuring What Counts: The Global Movement for Well-Being, co-authored by Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz, charts the global movement of the past decade and questions the idea of the Gross Domestic Product or GDP. Calling for a new criteria of judgment, the book examines factors such as inequality, economic vulnerability and environmental sustainability and its impact on the population and its overall idea of success. In this session, Stiglitz delves on the fundamental question of how we measure our lives and presents a new path ahead.  In conversation with entrepreneur and investor Mohit Satyanand.


 

Programme 2021

26 Feb | 09:00 AM - 09:40 AM Front Lawn

Morning Music: HARPREET

Harpreet is a versatile artiste who sings original musical compositions in Hindi, as well as in Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese, Rajasthani and Haryanvi. Trained in Hindustani classical music, he plays both the guitar and flute. His talent fuses both the modern and traditional when composing tunes to his own lyrics and for classical poetry that he loves. He is best known for creating musical scores to the works of poets such as Kabir and Bulleh Shah. His original composition Kutte (dog), a song about a canine’s view of human life, was selected by Bollywood film director Dibakar Banerjee and Kanu Behl for the film Titli. Some of his yet-to be-released compositions, Geet Aur Shabd, Kho Gaye He Wo and Sonapani, have received wide appreciation.

26 Feb | 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM Front Lawn

These are dangerous times for democracy. In his new book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?, renowned philosopher Michael Sandel shows how the polarised politics of our time reflects the deep divide between winners and losers. He argues that we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalisation and rising inequality. In conversation with celebrated author and Member of Parliament Shashi Tharoor, Sandel offers an ethic of dignity and solidarity that points the way to a new politics of the common good.
 

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM Front Lawn

“It’s easy to feel powerless in the face of a problem as big as climate change. But you’re not powerless. And you don’t have to be a politician or a philanthropist to make a difference.” – Bill Gates

In conversation with Alok Sharma, President of the COP26 Climate Conference and former Secretary of State for Business, Bill Gates will set out a wide-ranging, practical—and accessible—plan for how the world can get to zero greenhouse gas emissions in time to avoid a climate catastrophe. Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide toward certain environmental disasters. He will explain not only why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal. 

26 Feb | 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM Durbar Hall

The House of Jaipur has all the ingredients necessary to define a legend: exquisite maharanis, handsome maharajahs on horseback, conspicuous wealth and what they call homes the rest of us call palaces. John Zubrzycki's latest book on this royal household goes behind sealed doors to unearth more untold stories, and also to set the vanishing phenomena of centuries old feudal life styles against the reality of post Independence modern democratic India. Zubrzycki is the author of books such as The Last Nizam: The Rise and Fall of India's Greatest Princely State,  The Mysterious Mr Jacob: Diamond Merchant, Magician and Spy and Jadoowallahs, Jugglers and Jinns: A Magical History of India. Archaeologist, historian and author Rima Hooja’s latest book is Maharana Pratap : The Invincible Warrior. In conversation with Sanjoy K. Roy, he introduces us to the fascinating inner world of the Royals.
 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Front Lawn

Our knowledge and information of the Aztec empire, their history and their conquest, for generations has been informed by the western pen. Author and historian Camilla Townsend’s Cundill History Prize winning Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs brings to light a complex and riveting history of the Aztecs based entirely on direct translations of the annals written in the neglected Nahuatl language. Townsend is the Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her other books include Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive. Peter Frankopan, Professor of Global History at Oxford University, is the author of The Silk Roads: A New History of the World and The News Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World. In conversation with Frankopan, she explores the precarious survival and brutal conquest of the people of the sun and their journey of endurance.
 

26 Feb | 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Durbar Hall

“The Taj Mahal rises above the banks of the river like a solitary tear suspended on the cheek of time.” -Rabindranath Tagore
 
The Taj Mahal is integral to Agra’s identity, history and economy. It is a focal point of the city’s profound Mughal legacy , which reflects in every aspect of its folk arts and heritage. It has become emblematic of romantic love and aesthetic beauty. Yet, this dream-like marble mausoleum faces potential damage from environmental pollution as well as cultural hostility by a segment of ultra nationalists. An absorbing session with Amita Baig, Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, Tripurdaman Singh and Sarthak Malhotra on the multi-faceted narratives of the Taj Mahal, its vital importance for India's tourism and its abiding place in the human imagination as a symbol of eternal love.
 
Amita Baig is the Executive Director of World Monuments Fund India. Her books include Taj Mahal: Multiple Narratives. Tripurdaman Singh is a British Academy postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. Singh's latest book is Sixteen Stormy Days: The Story of the First Amendment of the Constitution of India. Sarthak Malhotra is an anthropologist and research scholar at the University of Cambridge. 
 

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM Front Lawn

Keshav Desiraju’s book, Of Gifted Voice: The Life and Art of MS Subbulakshmi, brings a new perspective to the most famous vocalist of Carnatic music. With access to less known information about her personal life, and seeing this in conjunction with the finesse  of her performances, the author hopes to correct some assumptions  about ‘MS’ the person and her command over a vast repertoire of compositions. Known to be a philanthropist and a woman of exquisite style, MS’s devotional music has enthralled generations of listeners. Jawaharlal Nehru called her the ‘Queen of  Music’ and adoring audiences thronged to her concerts. Writer and broadcast journalist Mrinal Pande is the former chairperson of Prasar Bharati. Writer and journalist Samanth Subramanian most recent book is A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of J.B.S. Haldane. In conversation with Pande and Subramanian, Desiraju places MS Subbulakshmi’s achievements in the larger context of the advent of film, radio and gramophone which dramatically altered the music industry. 
The book will be launched at this session during the Jaipur Literature Festival 2021.  

26 Feb | 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM Durbar Hall

Senior journalist and columnist Anant Vijay delves into the roots of a historic victory and defeat at Amethi where Smriti Irani wrested this key parliamentary seat from the incumbent Rahul Gandhi, in 2019. He examines the behind-the-scenes struggles and battles, the excitement and high tension, the interplay of local and national interests in this real life political thriller.

The author will be in conversation with Kanchan Gupta

26 Feb | 02:00 PM - 02:45 PM Front Lawn

 

A master of expression and text, award-winning Irish writer Colm Tóibín possesses a unique ability to inhabit and blend through his words an expansive universe of fiction, nonfiction and poetry. He is the bestselling author of The Master, The Blackwater Lightship,  The Testament of Mary and Nora Webster. His upcoming book is The Magician. In conversation with Nandini Nair, Tóibín takes us through the rhythm and roots of his writing process and celebrated career.


 

26 Feb | 2:00 PM - 02:45 PM Durbar Hall

Scholar and author Daniel Simpson’s recent book The Truth of Yoga takes us on a journey through the origins, development and concept of Yoga. Cutting through myth and misinformation, the text provides a comprehensive overview of this age-old discipline which is celebrated worldwide for its mental, physical and spiritual benefits. Simpson teaches courses on yoga philosophy at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and at Triyoga in London. He draws on his experience as a journalist to make the subject accessible. Yoga practitioner and teacher Ranju Roy is the co-author ofEmbodying the Yoga Sūtra: Support, Direction, Space and teaches courses on the practice and philosophy of yoga. In conversation with Roy, Simpson delves into the past, present and future of this ancient tradition.
 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM Front Lawn

Anish Kapoor has succeeded in transforming the cool, conceptual, and minimal approach to sculpture by adding lyricism, metaphor, and the heat of the primordial. Objects spill out from their own parameters, yet they also stand serenely as in meditative focus as if for ritual. Typically, the sculptures appear abstract, with Kapoor's intention to promote self-reflection made most obvious when using mirrored surfaces. He does not wish to present a prescriptive idea, but instead to create an environment within which people themselves can consider meaning. As the viewer becomes part of the sculpture, each work speaks of the confined individuality of a single body, but also of the expansive inclusiveness of a shared place. His sculptures paradoxically entwine esoteric philosophy with sensual everyday experience. In this session, one of India’s greatest artists talks about his life and work with his friend Homi K. Bhabha.
 

26 Feb | 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM Durbar Hall

Journalist and writer George Packer’s Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century is an enduring account of the force behind the Dayton Accords which famously ended the Balkan wars. Packer’s sweeping diplomatic history is based on Holbrooke's diaries and papers and gives a peek into the life of man both equally admired and detested. Packer’s other works include The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq and Blood of the Liberals. In conversation with journalist and writer Basharat Peer, Packer dives into the life and career of an extraordinary and deeply flawed man and the political and social circles he inhabited.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM Front Lawn

Meelis Friedenthal’s historical novel Mesilased: The Bees is based in Estonia of the 17th century. Using a fabulist technique the author explores philosophy and science as twin factors influencing the hero, Laurentius, who,accompanied  by  his parrot  Clodia, travels to Tartu.  The Estonian city, famed as the abode of the Muses, turns out to be a place of destitution and disease. While Laurentius submits to various treatments for his bodily and mental illnesses, he faints and begins to see an enchanting bee-like maiden in his hallucinatory condition.  The novel melts the boundaries between history and speculation, creating a fascinating discussion on the perception of reality. In conversation with Meelis Friedenthal is academic and writer Malashri Lal. Lal’s recent book is Betrayed By Hope: A Play On The Life Of Michael Madhusudan Dutt.
 

26 Feb | 04:00 PM - 04:45 PM Durbar Hall

A world still reeling from the impact of the COVID19 pandemic has also seen a silver lining in the situation - a paradigm shift to an evolving digital space for artisans and craftsmen that is replete with creative possibilities. A panel that discusses and analyses the efforts on becoming an Atmanirbhar Bharat with the revitalised focus on local crafts, heirloom products, sustainable consumption with an emphasis on ecological and social impact while driving revenues.

 


 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM Front Lawn

The pandemic has provided many parts of the planet a reprieve from the worst effects of pollution, demonstrating that the problem has solutions and is at least partially reversible. It has also served as a potent reminder that burning of fossil fuels is no longer feasible because the severe consequences and alternative measures are imperative for the survival of our planet. An important session that looks at the human cost of air pollution, be it natural or man made, and the possibility of change. Jyoti Pande Lavakare is a journalist, columnist and author of Breathing Here Is Injurious to Your Health: The Human Cost of Air Pollution and How You Can Be the Change. Academic and author Alastair Lewis is a Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the University of York and a Science Director at the National Centre for Atmospheric Science. Siddharth Singh is an energy, mobility and climate policy expert. He was selected to be a German Chancellor Fellow in 2016-17 and is the author of The Great Smog of India. In conversation with Anumita Roychowdhury, the Executive Director, Research and Advocacy, Centre For Science and Environment, they look at solutions for clean air, and discuss the potential for innovative political, economic and social reform that need to be addressed to make a credible impact on emissions and the quality and value of human life.
 

26 Feb | 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM Durbar Hall

Marina Wheeler opens the portals of memory as the daughter of a woman traumatised by the Partition of 1947 that divided British India into Pakistan and India. The Lost Homestead: My Mother, Partition and the Punjab tracks a parallel story of the dreams of nation building in India and also a displaced woman’s struggle to find economic and social space in her new habitat. Wheeler follows her mother's buried past, her marriage and move to England where she refuses to look over her shoulder at a lost world. Wheeler is a Queen’s Counsel in England.  Author and diplomat Navtej Sarna’s books include The Book of Nanak,  Savage Harvest (a translation of partition stories of MS Sarna) and The Exile: A Novel Based on the Life of Maharaja Duleep Singh. He is the former High Commissioner of India to the United Kingdom. In conversation with Sarna, she explores the meaning of Punjab Sikh identity as it survives through cultural transitions.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM Front Lawn

Academic and author Richard M. Eaton’s book India in the Persianate Age is a diverse and rich account of the Indian subcontinent’s interaction with cultures and people across the world through the centuries. Focusing on the introduction of Persianate culture into the region, the book explores the assimilation and integration of the traditions with India’s Sanskritic cultures and into the fabric of our language, art, architecture, literature, cuisine, and more. Eaton is the Professor of History at the University of Arizona. His other books include A Social History Of The Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives and Essays on Islam and Indian History. In conversation with author and Festival Co Director William Dalrymple, Eaton takes us on a journey through the influences and traditions that made India establish its diverse cultural roots.
 

26 Feb | 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM Durbar Hall

Enter Stage Right: The Alkazi-Padamsee Family Memoir is a heartfelt homage to one of the greatest alliances in the world of theatre and art in post-Independence India: the Alkazi-Padamsees. Penned by noted director Feisal Alkazi, son of the late theatre veteran and Director of the National School of Drama Ebrahim Alkazi, and Roshen Alkazi, pioneering costumier and founder-director of Art Heritage, the memoir charmingly recounts the stories and anecdotes that constitute the history of Indian theatre, bringing them to life with insightful observations and more than 50 archival photographs. In this memorable session, he speaks to Quasar Thakore Padamsee to discuss the institutional legacy of their family and how they shaped the future of arts in India. In conversation with festival producer Sanjoy K Roy.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM Front Lawn

“India lives in her villages,” said Gandhi. Although agriculture is the most important sector of the economy, accounting for close to 16 %of the GDP and providing employment to much of the nation's workforce, rural-urban distances and divides continue to grow. The incomprehension between those who contribute to growing our food and those who consume it widens by the day. All political parties claim to represent the farmer but the tiller of the soil is mute and invisible in the process of decision making. Climate change further impacts the uncertainties that farmers face. An engaged panel speaks of the paradoxes of policy and the complex issues involved in bringing about much-needed reforms and discusses the signposts ahead. Kota Neelima is an Indian author, researcher, artist and political commentator, specialising in rural distress, gender and her work focuses on the condition of women farmers, farmer suicides and peripheries of democratic societies. Economist, author and columnist Surjit Bhalla is currently the Executive Director for India at the International Monetary Fund. Dushyant Dave is a senior advocate and former president of the Supreme Court Bar Association. Sanket Upadhyay is an anchor and Executive editor at NDTV.
 

26 Feb | 07:00 PM - 07:45 PM Durbar Hall

“If we want to put people first, we have to know what matters to them, what improves their well-being, and how we can supply more of whatever that is.” —Joseph E. Stiglitz

 

A thought-provoking and critical look into society's measure of prosperity, Measuring What Counts: The Global Movement for Well-Being, co-authored by Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz, charts the global movement of the past decade and questions the idea of the Gross Domestic Product or GDP. Calling for a new criteria of judgment, the book examines factors such as inequality, economic vulnerability and environmental sustainability and its impact on the population and its overall idea of success. In this session, Stiglitz delves on the fundamental question of how we measure our lives and presents a new path ahead.  In conversation with entrepreneur and investor Mohit Satyanand.


 

26 Feb | 08:00 PM Front Lawn

After Junun where Shye Ben Tzur collaborated with numerous musicians from Rajasthan, India and Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, Ben Tzur initiates a live experimental voyage where all the beats and compositions are recreated live. Ben Tzur’s previous work Junun with Jonny Greenwood was recorded and mixed by Nigel Goodrich in a 15th century Fort in Jodhpur, India.Junun was also documented by Paul Thomas Anderson into a film by the same title. Besides playing independent concerts and performing in Festivals, Junun has supported Radiohead’s tours  in Europe, Israel, South and North America. His new project is aLive music solo performance with devotional poetries filmed and recorded in the Augusta Victoria Church and on the outskirts of Jerusalem’s sacred landscape. Halel is a 43 min artistic journey moving from meditation to  ecstasy.