Programme 2020

Programme
24 Jan | 8:45AM - 9:00AM
NEXA Front Lawn

EkPrana: ‘The Chair is Your New Mat’

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 9:00 AM - 9:40 AM
NEXA Front Lawn

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
NEXA Front Lawn

In a magical session that brings the music of words to life, the acclaimed vocalist Shubha Mudgal reads from and speaks her debut collection of short stories, Looking for Miss Sargam. Her book, set in the world of classical Indian music, is wry, tongue in cheek and full of deep insights and perspectives. In conversation with editor Sudha Sadanand, Mudgal tells us of the elusive Miss Sargam, of the traditions, realities and contradictions that a musician straddles and the realities that her narratives invoke.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Charbagh

An award-winning writer and broadcaster, Howard Jacobson’s novels include The Mighty Walzer, winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize, Kalooki Nights, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the highly acclaimed The Act of Love and, most recently, the Man Booker Prize 2010-winning The Finkler Question.
Here, in conversation with Chandrahas Choudhury he talks about his life in writing and his latest novel, Live a Little, a wickedly observed novel about falling in love at the end of your life. Told with Jacobson’s trademark wit and style, it  is in equal parts funny, irreverent and tender – a novel to make you consider all the paths not taken and whether you could still change course.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Mughal Tent

How do you capture your own life and that of your close family in writing? How different is memoir from the autobiographical novel? Masters of the genre Nicholas Coleridge, Åsne Seierstad, Avi Shlaim, Lemn Sissay and Madhur Jaffrey discuss the difficulty of pinning the self to paper with Chiki Sarkar.

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable. It was this that rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that so many people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion-an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus-had been a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history.
The emergence of Christianity is the single most transformative development in Western history. Even the increasing number in the West today who have abandoned the faith of their forebears, and dismiss all religion as pointless superstition, remain in part its heirs. Ranging in time from the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BC to the on-going migration crisis in Europe today, and from Nebuchadnezzar to the Beatles, award-winning historian Tom Holland, in conversation with Swapan Dasgupta, explores  just what it was that made Christianity so revolutionary and disruptive; how completely it came to saturate the mind-set of Latin Christendom; and why, in a West that has become increasingly doubtful of religion's claims, so many of its instincts remain irredeemably Christian.

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

The first British women to set foot in India did so in the very early 17th century, two and a half centuries before the Raj. Women made their way to India for exactly the same reasons men did— to carve out a better life for themselves. In the early days, India was a place where the slates of 'blotted pedigrees' were wiped clean, bankrupts given a chance to make good and  a taste for adventure satisfied — for women. They went and worked as milliners, bakers, dress-makers, actresses, portrait painters, maids, shop-keepers, governesses, teachers, boarding house proprietors, midwives, nurses, missionaries, doctors, geologists, plant-collectors, writers, travellers and—most surprising of all —traders.
The history of the British in India has cast a long shadow over these women. ‘Memsahibs’, once a word of respect, is now more likely to be a byword for snobbery and even racism. And it is true: prejudice of every kind did cloud many aspects of British involvement in India. But was not invariably the case.
In this landmark session, celebrated chronicler Katie Hickman, in conversation with Bee Rowlatt uncovers stories, until now hidden from history. Through diaries, letters and memoirs, many still in manuscript form, this exciting book reveals the extraordinary life and times of hundreds of women who made their way across the sea and changed history.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Samvad

The legendary poet, folklorist, translator and scholar AK Ramanujan left an indelible mark on the understanding and appreciation of Indian literature around the world. After his premature death in 1993, Ramanujan’s personal journals, diaries and notes, referred to as the AKR Papers remained with the University of Chicago until his son Krishna Ramanujan and Guillermo Rodriguez edited them. Published as Journeys: A Poet’s Diary, they take us to the heart of the poet scholar’s vision and work. Krishna Ramanujan is a science writer at Cornell University. Guillermo Rodriguez is the Founding Director of Casa de la India and the author of When Mirrors are Windows: A View of A.K. Ramanujan’s Poetics. In conversation with poet and curator Ranjit Hoskote, they bring Ramanujan’s luminous aesthetics to life.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

Namita Gokhale, author and festival director, launches her new novel Jaipur Journals. Set against the backdrop of the vibrant Jaipur Literature Festival, it is partly a love letter to the ‘greatest literary show on Earth’, partly an ode to the millions of aspiring authors who wander with unsubmitted manuscripts in their bags — and in the end a tribute to that loneliest tribe of them all: the writers. In conversation with diplomat and author Shashi Tharoor alongside poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar, she discusses the themes of her new novel and how her two personas come together in it.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Charbagh

Omani writer Jokha Alharthi was awarded the Man Booker International Prize for the year 2019 for her magnificent novel Celestial Bodies.  She is the first Arabic-language winner of the prize. Originally entitled “Sayyidat al-Qamr” (“Ladies of the Moon”), this inventive, multigenerational tale is set in the fictional desert village of al-Awafi.  In conversation with Dr. Mohamed Zarrouk and Prof. Zikrur Rahman, she speaks of her novel’s exploration – through the prism of one family’s losses and loves – of Oman’s coming-of-age.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Mughal Tent

A woman’s work is never done. Indian women’s participation in the workforce is decreasing steadily, even as figures rise in the rest of the world. A deep discussion on women and work, with anecdotal insights and perspectives, to analyse current realities and ponder how to understand, respect and revive the role of women in the economic sphere. A panel of women from diverse backgrounds, including an iconic chef, an ex-marine, a social entrepreneur and a rural activist speak to journalist Namita Bhandare of the causes and consequences of the roadblocks that come in the way of women’s working lives.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

The JCB Prize for Literature, founded in 2018, has quickly established benchmarks in literary excellence. In this insightful session, join members of the 2019 Jury, two of whom are well-known writers and one who is among India’s most versatile environmentalists as they discuss what makes the cut as a piece of literature.
 
Sahitya Akademi award-winning feminist Malayali writer and journalist K.R. Meera’s novel Aarachar won the prestigious Odakkuzhal Prize in 2013 and remains remains one of the highest-selling books in Malayalam. Pradip Krishen is a naturalist, environmentalist and the author-photographer of the critically acclaimed Trees of Delhi: A Field Guide. Journalist, editor and writer Parvati Sharma has authored the recent biography Jahangir: An Intimate Portrait of a Great Mughal.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

The condition of being a Muslim today is inevitably linked to the question of alienation and violence with the younger generation of Muslims facing a crisis of particular identity and moral reconciliation. The looming accusations of terror make young Muslims increasingly susceptible to radicalisation through the manipulation of religious feelings. Omar Ghobash’s Letters to a Young Muslim recognises this uncomfortable truth and is a personal, pertinent and poignant collection of essays, relayed through an exchange of letters between father and son. In conversation with Rakhshanda Jalil, author of You Don’t Look Like a Muslim, this timely session confronts common perceptions of Islam and reminds us of the true tenets of the faith.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Samvad

Rajasthani Sahitya Akademi awardees across generations speak of the rich heritage and linguistic traditions of the state. Rajasthani finds voice in its distinctive syntax and variety of dialects – yet still awaits official recognition in the schedule of Indian languages. Chandra Prakash Deval, Raju Ram Bijarniya, Ritupriya and Madhur Acharya read and recite from their work and speak with Vishes Kothari about the unique genius of Rajasthani literature in its many moods and manifestations.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

Lisa Ray is one of India’s first supermodels, an actor, a mother of twins through surrogacy and a cancer-survivor. Her memoir is an unflinching and a deeply moving account of her nomadic existence, her mentors, friends, lovers, her healing and spiritual quest. In conversation with Jaipur Literature Festival producer Sanjoy K. Roy, she discusses her riveting life story.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Charbagh

Writer and TIME editor-at-large Anand Giridharadas takes on the privileged classes in his scorching new book, the bestselling Winners Take All. It investigates the global elite’s efforts to ‘change the world’ except in ways that threaten the social order and their position atop it. This searing critique of modern plutocrats who seek to do more good but never less harm is described as a call to action for elites and everyday citizens alike. A session that offers transformative perspectives to complex societal problems. In conversation with Åsne Seierstad.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Mughal Tent

The long-standing US-India ties are founded on the common principle of democracy. Each period in modern history has added fresh layers to this important relationship in the context of global security, stability, trade and investment. In 2019, ‘Howdy Modi’, a milestone community summit, was hosted by the Texas India Forum for Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Donald Trump in Houston. Over 50,000 people attended the sold-out event. In this session, the historic US-India relationship will be examined against the backdrop of newer narratives. Varghese K. George, associate editor, US correspondent and author of Open Embrace: India-US ties in the age of Modi and Trump, former foreign secretary and author of How India Sees the World: Kautilya to the 21st Century Shyam Saran, and writer and former Indian Ambassador to the United States Navtej Sarna discuss the past, present and future of relations between the world’s two biggest democracies. Jeffrey Gettleman is an American journalist who won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

Floods have ravaged India’s urban landscapes with unprecedented fury over the last decade. Mumbai, Surat, Srinagar, Chennai, Patna and cities across Kerala have all been swallowed up by floodwaters and sewage. These were not isolated, freak phenomena but signalled a larger ecological devastation. Jairam Ramesh is an economist, environmentalist, politician and author of Green Signals. Viju B’s book Flood and Fury: Ecological Devastation in the Western Ghats investigates the ecological crisis in the Western Ghats. Krupa Ge’s Rivers Remember: #ChennaiRains and the Shocking Truth of a Manmade Flood covers the catastrophic floods that ravaged Chennai in 2015.  In conversation with energy and water expert Marcus Moench, they speak of flood and fury, and how to reverse the rage of the rivers.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was destined to be the conscience and political catalyst of his age. On the 150th anniversary of his birth, a session that searches the aspects of his legacy that have remained immutable with time. A distinguished panel, including writers and scholars Talat Ahmed and Makarand R. Paranjape alongside filmmaker Ramesh Sharma speak with feminist and human rights activist Ruchira Gupta about the enduring truths enshrined in Gandhi’s life and the teachings he bequeathed to a troubled world, as well as the distortions they have been subjected to.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Samvad

In a world veering between dark dystopias and a new understanding of our planet and cosmos, speculative fiction provides both solace and inspiration even as it awakens primal fears. Rakesh Kaul’s recent novel, Dawn, The Warrior Princess of Kashmir, set in AD 3000, addresses a future of weaponised AI and mind-controlled automatons where stories and histories are manipulated, where men have lost their souls and all the women have been slain. All except the last princess of Kashmir, who invokes and unleashes the cosmic powers to restore the human world. Author and entrepreneurs Vineet Bajpai’s bestselling Harappa trilogy blurs the lines between history, myth and fantasy. Together, in conversation with Nishtha Gautam, the two writers speak of how the use the genre to craft compelling stories, across time portals and intersections of the past and future.
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

The Cartiers is the revealing tale of a jewelry dynasty — four generations, from revolutionary France to the 1970s. At its heart are the three Cartier brothers whose motto was ‘Never copy, only create’ and who made their family firm internationally famous in the early days of the 20th century, thanks to their unique and complementary talents: Louis, the visionary designer who created the first men’s wristwatch to help an aviator friend tell the time without taking his hands off the controls of his flying machine; Pierre, the master dealmaker who bought the New York headquarters on Fifth Avenue for a double-stranded natural pearl necklace; and Jacques, the globe-trotting gemstone expert whose travels to India gave Cartier access to the world’s best rubies, emeralds, and sapphires, inspiring the celebrated Tutti Frutti jewelry. 

Francesca Cartier Brickell, whose great-grandfather was the youngest of the brothers, has travelled the world researching her family’s history, tracking down those connected with her ancestors and discovering long-lost pieces of the puzzle along the way. 

Now she reveals never-before-told dramas, romances, intrigues, betrayals, and more. Published in the 200th anniversary of the birth of the dynasty’s founder, Louis-François Cartier, this book is a magnificent, definitive, epic social history shown through the deeply personal lens of one legendary family.

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Charbagh

There is a city on the western shores of India where it no longer rains...

The sea has invaded its boundaries and its inhabitants reside in a towering structure called the Bombadrome, which hovers above the barren land. Theirs is an artificially equated society; they lead technologically directed lives; they have no memory of the past. They don't remember that this place was once called Bom Bahia, or Bombay, or Mumbai.

Except for one man, the last civil servant of the India of old, a witness to the time when it all fell apart, now bitter, filled with regret and thought to be mad. For decades he has remained silent, but now a moment has come, which comes but rarely in history, that prompts him into a final act of service: To remind people of what happened all those years ago, of the events that unmade the city, then the nation, and finally their lives...

Sharp, layered and scathing, The Black Dwarves of the Good Little Bay will grab you by the scruff of your neck and force you to listen. Because the sins of the past can never be fully hidden. Because the end can never justify the means.

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Mughal Tent

The Swansea University Dylan Thomas Prize is one of the world’s biggest prizes for young writers, celebrating literary excellence and raw talent. It is awarded to the best fictional prose, poetry or drama published in English anywhere in the world by an author aged 39 or under. Established in 2006, the Prize celebrates 15 years in a discussion including
first ever winner, Rachel Trezise and latest winner, Guy Gunaratne,  along with jury member and Festival co-Director Namita Gokhale and the Prize’s Executive Officer Elaine Canning. The 2020 longlist will be announced  during the session.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

Writer, politician and public intellectual Shashi Tharoor is the award-winning author of 19 books of fiction and non-fiction. A third-term Member of Parliament, representing Thiruvananthapuram, Dr. Tharoor has served as Minister of State in the Government of India and also as Under-Secretary General of the United Nations. His unerring sense of humour lightens up the serious oeuvre of his work, which includes a powerful indictment of colonialism. His predilection for long words and telling phrases has created a sub-genre of #Tharoorisms, and his recent attempts at stand up comedy have won him a constituency of admirers. In conversation with Michael Dwyer, he speaks he speaks of the personal and the political, and the beliefs and ideas that have anchored him in his public life and literary career.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Charbagh

With Asia at the centre of international geopolitics, an incisive session examines the players and positions amidst shifting perspectives and situations. Bruno Maçães’ recent books include The Dawn of Eurasia: On the Trail of a New World Order, an account of the coming integration of Europe and Asia. Shivshankar Menon’s latest book, Past Present: India in Asian Geopolitics, takes a long deep look at the Asian story. Deepak Nayyar is author of Resurgent Asia, which highlights development and economic transformation over the past 50 years. Together, in conversation with journalist Suhasini Haidar, they discuss and dissect Asia’s place in the new world order.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Mughal Tent

Director, producer, lyricist and former Reliance Entertainment Chairman Amit Khanna has been part of the Indian entertainment industry’s evolution and witnessed several decades of excitement, turmoil and growth. His book, Words. Sounds. Images: A History of Media and Entertainment in India, is a first of its kind exploration of the subject, from the time of the Indus Valley Civilisation until the present. A session that searches the fascinating history of this incomparable business, with Khanna, Shobhaa De, author, columnist and founding editor of leading film and entertainment magazines, and poet Javed Akhtar.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

Anamika is the author of several award winning poetry collections and novels including Aaina Saz, deeply inspired by folk traditions and the metaphysical strains of the rebel Bhakta poets. In conversation with Nishtha Gautam, Opinion Editor at The Quint, she discusses her  books, beliefs and the core of conviction that sustains her writing practice.

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

Damian Barr, Arthur Japin and Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how their LGBT sexuality has affected their life and impacted on their writing in a session moderated by Vivek Tejuja
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Samvad

An illuminating session on the subtle and continuing influence of the planet Saturn on our lives. Ayurvedic doctor, scholar and best selling author Robert Svoboda elaborates on the Greatness of Saturn, a powerful myth taken from the East Indian Vedic tradition, honouring the planet which personifies time, limitation, loss and adversity. In conversation with artist Abhishek Singh, they interpret the myth together and deliberate on its immense therapeutic potential to bring hope, to heal and to ultimately provide a deeper understanding of what it means to be human.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

The rich diversity of Indian democracy has negotiated difficult challenges over the years. In an era of disruption, how will its institutions and social fabric face the demands of change? If change is the only constant, how will they keep in step with the demands of the times? A conversation across disciplines and political positions that addresses the concerns of our fractured realities.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Charbagh

Every bit as radical the name suggests, ClientEarth continues to be a necessary intervention in times of rampant ecological devastation. Comprising of a bastion of passionate and purposeful lawyers, the revolutionary non-profit law organisation has sought to represent the Earth and advocate for its interests. Martin Goodman speaks about his latest book, which charts the journey of the firm, and provides insight into the development of environmental enforcement litigation and its broader implications. A session to bring back hope, featuring eminent writers and environmentalists in conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, as they discuss our responsibility towards the Earth and discuss what it means to act planet. Martin Goodman has co-authored Client Earth with his husband James Thornton, who helms the pioneering organisation.  Politician, economist and environmentalist Jairam Ramesh has written Green Signals. American journalist David Wallace-Wells is known for his writings on climate change and has written the essay ‘The Uninhabitable Earth’, which he later expanded into the 2019 book The Uninhabitable Earth
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Mughal Tent

Celebrated writers dissect the anatomy of the love story as they speak of friendship and celebrity, relations and the human heart as well as love, life and affluenza. Writer and entrepreneur Ravinder Singh worked with Infosys and Microsoft before personal tragedy pushed him to pen a love story that resonated with millions of readers. His latest novel, The Belated Bachelor Party, moves away from romance to celebrate friendship. Shunali Khullar Shroff’s sizzling new novel Love in the Time of Affluenza is sharp, perceptive and rib-splittingly funny. Together, in conversation with writer Divia Thani, they speak of the enduring human need for love stories and their variations on the theme.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ‘ikigai’ or ‘a reason to jump out of bed every morning’. The international bestseller by Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles shares the Japanese secret to a long and happy life and has helped readers around the world to find purpose, nurture friendships and throw themselves into their passions. In conversation with writer and columnist Nilanjana S. Roy, co-author Francesc Miralles joins us at the Jaipur Literature Festival to share the inspirations, learnings and tools of’ ikigai’.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

Writing for young readers requires a leap of perception and emotional intelligence. Authors across genres who invest in communicating with the unfettered landscape of the young mind tell us of how they reach out to the child within in their creative process. Author, poet and translator Deepa Agarwal has written over 50 books, most of them for young readers. Celebrated novelist Hansda Sowvendra Shekhar has recently written Jwala Kumar and the Gift of Fire: Adventures in Champakbagh. Historian and biographer Parvati Sharma is the author of Rattu and Poorie's Adventures in History: 1857, which records an exciting and engrossing account of time travel. Author and illustrator Devangana Dash has written, illustrated and designed The Jungle Radio: Bird Songs of India, a picture book rooted in conservation and environmental storytelling. Together, they speak to writer and novelist Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan about how and why they write, the challenges and rewards of their writing.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Samvad

Writers, artists and activists speak of the power of words and images, theatre and film in opening minds and hearts to societal issues. Award-winning poet and playwright Sholeh Wolpé seeks to bridge the political divide between her native Iran and her adopted Western homes through her poetry and translations of works of Iranian writers, notably Sufi poet Attar’s The Conference of the Birds. Benjamin Dix is the author of the graphic novel Vanni: A Family’s Struggle through the Sri Lankan Conflict and Founding Director of the non-profit PositiveNegatives, which produces literary comics exploring complex social and human rights issues by adapting personal testimonies into art, education and advocacy. Emmy-winning journalist and activist Ruchira Gupta is the founder of the anti-sex-trafficking organisation Apne Aap and author of Priya and The Lost Girls, which follows Priya, India’s first augmented reality female superhero who fights for women’s rights and equality. Vani Tripathi Tikoo is the youngest ever member of the Central Board of Film Certification. Her campaigns and outreach programmes have focused on encouraging women’s participation in politics as well as issues revolving around education, empowerment and employment.
 

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

As we begin our journey of the beautifully Indian mind, it is as if we are opening doors to the many vistas of beauty that invite us to the numerous artistic representations created by our potters and poets that beckon us and even more to the majestic truths that underpin these beautiful creations. It is through the Indian aesthetic mind and its concepts of the beautiful that the Indian civilisation can be best understood, for in that mind are pages of history and voices of the past.

This book is a journey into that charmed and beautiful mind from which has arisen concepts and ideas, forms and textures, words and music, movement and stillness.

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Charbagh

Monsters, angels, aliens whoever they are… 

We’ll find out about them!

Chapati monsters, angels coming from the Andromeda Galaxy?!

What rubbish…

Matt Winston and his fans are truly crazy.

Why would they believe a rumour?

We’ll find out in three epic short stories in this book!

What a mysterious world we live in!

This book has the answers to the rumours spread by Matt Winston. Who is he? Find out by reading this book.

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Mughal Tent

The newest publication from Art1st and the first in the Arts Integration Series, the book concurrently explores the works of Indian artists and the joy of verbs and action words. The book takes the young reader on a journey of actions as drawn from the works of eminent Indian Artists, along with a set of engaging art and language activities. The child protagonist awakes to the wonders of a new morning, makes some friends and has a wonderful day. The concept revolved around action in art, as found in a collection of paintings made by different artists. Using various production techniques, a vibrant colour palette and an engaging and hidden activity segment on each page, the design makes it an action-packed read.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
NEXA Front Lawn

For our 19th century forebears, science meant progress and hope. Today, we are not so sure. With Google and Facebook harvesting our data and listening to our every conversation in the service of surveillance capitalism, with development bringing environmental catastrophe in its wake and with robots replacing more and more human jobs, we now fear science the industries associated with it as much as we look to it as a solution to our problems. Here, scientist and mathematician Marcus de Sautoy, dystopian novelist John Lanchester and Jaspreet Bindra, author of the Tech Whisperer, discuss the Cyber Future
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Charbagh

How does one capture the life of a woman in writing? How different is the feminine biography from that of a man? Biographers Bettany Hughes, Benjamin Moser, Jung Chang, Lindsey Hilsum and Hallie Rubenhold discuss the difficulty of pinning to paper the lives of women to paper in conversation with Anita Anand.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Mughal Tent

Diversity is both the inspiration and the glue for creativity and resilience. In a session that discusses ‘otherness’, a range of inspirational speakers from different cultures and backgrounds speak of literary diversity and the need to foreground and create visibility in the publishing ecosystem, beyond tokenism and across the spectrum of race, colour and sexual orientation. London-based writer Sunny Singh is the founder of the Jhalak Prize for a Writer of Colour. Indian-born Australian writer Roanna Gonsalves writes on themes on multi-cultural imagination recently released her debut novel Sunita De Souza Goes To Sydney. Hansda Sowendra Shekhar is the author of the JCB Prize-shortlisted My Father’s Garden, The Adivasi Will Not Dance and The Mysterious Ailment of Rupi Baskey, which won the Sahitya Akademi Yuva Puraskar. Writer Annie Zaidi’s Bread, Cement, Cactus won the prestigious Nine Dots Prize for combining memoir and reportage to explore contemporary notions of belonging. In conversation with Urvashi Butalia, co-founder of feminist publishing houses Kali for Women and Zubaan, this session brings a cross section of voices and perspectives in an important discussion on literary diversity.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Bank Of Baroda Baithak

Two recent biographies evoke landmark moments in time and place. Economist, author and politician Jairam Ramesh has written A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon, a compelling biography of one of India’s most controversial and consequential public figures. Award-winning journalist Samanth Subramanian is the author of A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of JBS Haldane, a portrait of the brilliant polymath and his time. In conversation with  Pallavi Raghavan, Assistant Professor at Ashoka University, they speak of the research and insights that shape their books and the importance of nuanced biography in our understanding of the recent past.

The session will be followed by the launch of Jairam Ramesh’s A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation Durbar Hall

A series of multi-vocal poetry readings, in many moods and metres featuring writers from around the world. Themes, rhythms and poetic styles converge in a joyous celebration of the poetic imagination.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Samvad

Many have hailed the widespread use of generic drugs as one of the most important public-health developments of the 21st century. Today, almost 90 percent of our pharmaceutical market is comprised of generics, the majority of which are manufactured overseas. We have been reassured by our doctors, our pharmacists and our regulators that generic drugs are identical to their brand-name counterparts, just less expensive. But is this really true?
Award-winning journalist’s Katherine Eban’s Bottle of Lies exposes the deceit behind generic-drug manufacturing and the attendant risks for global health. Drawing on exclusive accounts from whistleblowers and regulators as well as thousands of pages of confidential FDA documents, Eban reveals an industry where fraud is rampant, companies routinely falsify data, and executives circumvent almost every principle of safe manufacturing to minimize cost and maximize profit, confident in their ability to fool inspectors.
A decade-long investigation with international sweep, high-stakes brinkmanship and big money at its core, Eban, in conversation with prize winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, reveals how the world’s greatest public-health innovation has become one of its most astonishing swindles.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
NEXA
Front Lawn

38. Shubha Mudgal: Looking for Miss Sargam

Shubha Mudgal in conversation with Sudha Sadhanand

Presented by RED FM

In a magical session that brings the music of words to life, the acclaimed vocalist Shubha Mudgal reads from and speaks her debut collection of short stories, Looking for Miss Sargam. Her book, set in the world of classical Indian music, is wry, tongue in cheek and full of deep insights and perspectives. In conversation with editor Sudha Sadanand, Mudgal tells us of the elusive Miss Sargam, of the traditions, realities and contradictions that a musician straddles and the realities that her narratives invoke.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

Namita Gokhale, author and festival director, launches her new novel Jaipur Journals. Set against the backdrop of the vibrant Jaipur Literature Festival, it is partly a love letter to the ‘greatest literary show on Earth’, partly an ode to the millions of aspiring authors who wander with unsubmitted manuscripts in their bags — and in the end a tribute to that loneliest tribe of them all: the writers. In conversation with diplomat and author Shashi Tharoor alongside poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar, she discusses the themes of her new novel and how her two personas come together in it.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

Lisa Ray is one of India’s first supermodels, an actor, a mother of twins through surrogacy and a cancer-survivor. Her memoir is an unflinching and a deeply moving account of her nomadic existence, her mentors, friends, lovers, her healing and spiritual quest. In conversation with Jaipur Literature Festival producer Sanjoy K. Roy, she discusses her riveting life story.
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

The Cartiers is the revealing tale of a jewelry dynasty — four generations, from revolutionary France to the 1970s. At its heart are the three Cartier brothers whose motto was ‘Never copy, only create’ and who made their family firm internationally famous in the early days of the 20th century, thanks to their unique and complementary talents: Louis, the visionary designer who created the first men’s wristwatch to help an aviator friend tell the time without taking his hands off the controls of his flying machine; Pierre, the master dealmaker who bought the New York headquarters on Fifth Avenue for a double-stranded natural pearl necklace; and Jacques, the globe-trotting gemstone expert whose travels to India gave Cartier access to the world’s best rubies, emeralds, and sapphires, inspiring the celebrated Tutti Frutti jewelry. 

Francesca Cartier Brickell, whose great-grandfather was the youngest of the brothers, has travelled the world researching her family’s history, tracking down those connected with her ancestors and discovering long-lost pieces of the puzzle along the way. 

Now she reveals never-before-told dramas, romances, intrigues, betrayals, and more. Published in the 200th anniversary of the birth of the dynasty’s founder, Louis-François Cartier, this book is a magnificent, definitive, epic social history shown through the deeply personal lens of one legendary family.

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

Writer, politician and public intellectual Shashi Tharoor is the award-winning author of 19 books of fiction and non-fiction. A third-term Member of Parliament, representing Thiruvananthapuram, Dr. Tharoor has served as Minister of State in the Government of India and also as Under-Secretary General of the United Nations. His unerring sense of humour lightens up the serious oeuvre of his work, which includes a powerful indictment of colonialism. His predilection for long words and telling phrases has created a sub-genre of #Tharoorisms, and his recent attempts at stand up comedy have won him a constituency of admirers. In conversation with Michael Dwyer, he speaks he speaks of the personal and the political, and the beliefs and ideas that have anchored him in his public life and literary career.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

The rich diversity of Indian democracy has negotiated difficult challenges over the years. In an era of disruption, how will its institutions and social fabric face the demands of change? If change is the only constant, how will they keep in step with the demands of the times? A conversation across disciplines and political positions that addresses the concerns of our fractured realities.
 

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

As we begin our journey of the beautifully Indian mind, it is as if we are opening doors to the many vistas of beauty that invite us to the numerous artistic representations created by our potters and poets that beckon us and even more to the majestic truths that underpin these beautiful creations. It is through the Indian aesthetic mind and its concepts of the beautiful that the Indian civilisation can be best understood, for in that mind are pages of history and voices of the past.

This book is a journey into that charmed and beautiful mind from which has arisen concepts and ideas, forms and textures, words and music, movement and stillness.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
NEXA
Front Lawn

For our 19th century forebears, science meant progress and hope. Today, we are not so sure. With Google and Facebook harvesting our data and listening to our every conversation in the service of surveillance capitalism, with development bringing environmental catastrophe in its wake and with robots replacing more and more human jobs, we now fear science the industries associated with it as much as we look to it as a solution to our problems. Here, scientist and mathematician Marcus de Sautoy, dystopian novelist John Lanchester and Jaspreet Bindra, author of the Tech Whisperer, discuss the Cyber Future
 

24 Jan | 8:45AM - 9:00AM
NEXA
Front Lawn

24 Jan | 9:00 AM - 9:40 AM
NEXA
Front Lawn

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Charbagh

39. Live a Little

Howard Jacobson in conversation with Chandrahas Choudhury

Presented by The Tribune

An award-winning writer and broadcaster, Howard Jacobson’s novels include The Mighty Walzer, winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize, Kalooki Nights, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the highly acclaimed The Act of Love and, most recently, the Man Booker Prize 2010-winning The Finkler Question.
Here, in conversation with Chandrahas Choudhury he talks about his life in writing and his latest novel, Live a Little, a wickedly observed novel about falling in love at the end of your life. Told with Jacobson’s trademark wit and style, it  is in equal parts funny, irreverent and tender – a novel to make you consider all the paths not taken and whether you could still change course.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Charbagh

Omani writer Jokha Alharthi was awarded the Man Booker International Prize for the year 2019 for her magnificent novel Celestial Bodies.  She is the first Arabic-language winner of the prize. Originally entitled “Sayyidat al-Qamr” (“Ladies of the Moon”), this inventive, multigenerational tale is set in the fictional desert village of al-Awafi.  In conversation with Dr. Mohamed Zarrouk and Prof. Zikrur Rahman, she speaks of her novel’s exploration – through the prism of one family’s losses and loves – of Oman’s coming-of-age.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Charbagh

Writer and TIME editor-at-large Anand Giridharadas takes on the privileged classes in his scorching new book, the bestselling Winners Take All. It investigates the global elite’s efforts to ‘change the world’ except in ways that threaten the social order and their position atop it. This searing critique of modern plutocrats who seek to do more good but never less harm is described as a call to action for elites and everyday citizens alike. A session that offers transformative perspectives to complex societal problems. In conversation with Åsne Seierstad.
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Charbagh

There is a city on the western shores of India where it no longer rains...

The sea has invaded its boundaries and its inhabitants reside in a towering structure called the Bombadrome, which hovers above the barren land. Theirs is an artificially equated society; they lead technologically directed lives; they have no memory of the past. They don't remember that this place was once called Bom Bahia, or Bombay, or Mumbai.

Except for one man, the last civil servant of the India of old, a witness to the time when it all fell apart, now bitter, filled with regret and thought to be mad. For decades he has remained silent, but now a moment has come, which comes but rarely in history, that prompts him into a final act of service: To remind people of what happened all those years ago, of the events that unmade the city, then the nation, and finally their lives...

Sharp, layered and scathing, The Black Dwarves of the Good Little Bay will grab you by the scruff of your neck and force you to listen. Because the sins of the past can never be fully hidden. Because the end can never justify the means.

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Charbagh

With Asia at the centre of international geopolitics, an incisive session examines the players and positions amidst shifting perspectives and situations. Bruno Maçães’ recent books include The Dawn of Eurasia: On the Trail of a New World Order, an account of the coming integration of Europe and Asia. Shivshankar Menon’s latest book, Past Present: India in Asian Geopolitics, takes a long deep look at the Asian story. Deepak Nayyar is author of Resurgent Asia, which highlights development and economic transformation over the past 50 years. Together, in conversation with journalist Suhasini Haidar, they discuss and dissect Asia’s place in the new world order.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Charbagh

Every bit as radical the name suggests, ClientEarth continues to be a necessary intervention in times of rampant ecological devastation. Comprising of a bastion of passionate and purposeful lawyers, the revolutionary non-profit law organisation has sought to represent the Earth and advocate for its interests. Martin Goodman speaks about his latest book, which charts the journey of the firm, and provides insight into the development of environmental enforcement litigation and its broader implications. A session to bring back hope, featuring eminent writers and environmentalists in conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, as they discuss our responsibility towards the Earth and discuss what it means to act planet. Martin Goodman has co-authored Client Earth with his husband James Thornton, who helms the pioneering organisation.  Politician, economist and environmentalist Jairam Ramesh has written Green Signals. American journalist David Wallace-Wells is known for his writings on climate change and has written the essay ‘The Uninhabitable Earth’, which he later expanded into the 2019 book The Uninhabitable Earth
 

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Charbagh

Monsters, angels, aliens whoever they are… 

We’ll find out about them!

Chapati monsters, angels coming from the Andromeda Galaxy?!

What rubbish…

Matt Winston and his fans are truly crazy.

Why would they believe a rumour?

We’ll find out in three epic short stories in this book!

What a mysterious world we live in!

This book has the answers to the rumours spread by Matt Winston. Who is he? Find out by reading this book.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Charbagh

How does one capture the life of a woman in writing? How different is the feminine biography from that of a man? Biographers Bettany Hughes, Benjamin Moser, Jung Chang, Lindsey Hilsum and Hallie Rubenhold discuss the difficulty of pinning to paper the lives of women to paper in conversation with Anita Anand.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Mughal Tent

40. On Memoir

Nicholas Coleridge, Avi Shlaim, Åsne Seierstad, Lemn Sissay and Madhur Jaffrey in conversation with Chiki Sarkar

How do you capture your own life and that of your close family in writing? How different is memoir from the autobiographical novel? Masters of the genre Nicholas Coleridge, Åsne Seierstad, Avi Shlaim, Lemn Sissay and Madhur Jaffrey discuss the difficulty of pinning the self to paper with Chiki Sarkar.

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Mughal Tent

A woman’s work is never done. Indian women’s participation in the workforce is decreasing steadily, even as figures rise in the rest of the world. A deep discussion on women and work, with anecdotal insights and perspectives, to analyse current realities and ponder how to understand, respect and revive the role of women in the economic sphere. A panel of women from diverse backgrounds, including an iconic chef, an ex-marine, a social entrepreneur and a rural activist speak to journalist Namita Bhandare of the causes and consequences of the roadblocks that come in the way of women’s working lives.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Mughal Tent

The long-standing US-India ties are founded on the common principle of democracy. Each period in modern history has added fresh layers to this important relationship in the context of global security, stability, trade and investment. In 2019, ‘Howdy Modi’, a milestone community summit, was hosted by the Texas India Forum for Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Donald Trump in Houston. Over 50,000 people attended the sold-out event. In this session, the historic US-India relationship will be examined against the backdrop of newer narratives. Varghese K. George, associate editor, US correspondent and author of Open Embrace: India-US ties in the age of Modi and Trump, former foreign secretary and author of How India Sees the World: Kautilya to the 21st Century Shyam Saran, and writer and former Indian Ambassador to the United States Navtej Sarna discuss the past, present and future of relations between the world’s two biggest democracies. Jeffrey Gettleman is an American journalist who won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Mughal Tent

The Swansea University Dylan Thomas Prize is one of the world’s biggest prizes for young writers, celebrating literary excellence and raw talent. It is awarded to the best fictional prose, poetry or drama published in English anywhere in the world by an author aged 39 or under. Established in 2006, the Prize celebrates 15 years in a discussion including
first ever winner, Rachel Trezise and latest winner, Guy Gunaratne,  along with jury member and Festival co-Director Namita Gokhale and the Prize’s Executive Officer Elaine Canning. The 2020 longlist will be announced  during the session.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Mughal Tent

Director, producer, lyricist and former Reliance Entertainment Chairman Amit Khanna has been part of the Indian entertainment industry’s evolution and witnessed several decades of excitement, turmoil and growth. His book, Words. Sounds. Images: A History of Media and Entertainment in India, is a first of its kind exploration of the subject, from the time of the Indus Valley Civilisation until the present. A session that searches the fascinating history of this incomparable business, with Khanna, Shobhaa De, author, columnist and founding editor of leading film and entertainment magazines, and poet Javed Akhtar.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Mughal Tent

Celebrated writers dissect the anatomy of the love story as they speak of friendship and celebrity, relations and the human heart as well as love, life and affluenza. Writer and entrepreneur Ravinder Singh worked with Infosys and Microsoft before personal tragedy pushed him to pen a love story that resonated with millions of readers. His latest novel, The Belated Bachelor Party, moves away from romance to celebrate friendship. Shunali Khullar Shroff’s sizzling new novel Love in the Time of Affluenza is sharp, perceptive and rib-splittingly funny. Together, in conversation with writer Divia Thani, they speak of the enduring human need for love stories and their variations on the theme.
 

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Mughal Tent

The newest publication from Art1st and the first in the Arts Integration Series, the book concurrently explores the works of Indian artists and the joy of verbs and action words. The book takes the young reader on a journey of actions as drawn from the works of eminent Indian Artists, along with a set of engaging art and language activities. The child protagonist awakes to the wonders of a new morning, makes some friends and has a wonderful day. The concept revolved around action in art, as found in a collection of paintings made by different artists. Using various production techniques, a vibrant colour palette and an engaging and hidden activity segment on each page, the design makes it an action-packed read.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Mughal Tent

Diversity is both the inspiration and the glue for creativity and resilience. In a session that discusses ‘otherness’, a range of inspirational speakers from different cultures and backgrounds speak of literary diversity and the need to foreground and create visibility in the publishing ecosystem, beyond tokenism and across the spectrum of race, colour and sexual orientation. London-based writer Sunny Singh is the founder of the Jhalak Prize for a Writer of Colour. Indian-born Australian writer Roanna Gonsalves writes on themes on multi-cultural imagination recently released her debut novel Sunita De Souza Goes To Sydney. Hansda Sowendra Shekhar is the author of the JCB Prize-shortlisted My Father’s Garden, The Adivasi Will Not Dance and The Mysterious Ailment of Rupi Baskey, which won the Sahitya Akademi Yuva Puraskar. Writer Annie Zaidi’s Bread, Cement, Cactus won the prestigious Nine Dots Prize for combining memoir and reportage to explore contemporary notions of belonging. In conversation with Urvashi Butalia, co-founder of feminist publishing houses Kali for Women and Zubaan, this session brings a cross section of voices and perspectives in an important discussion on literary diversity.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

41. Dominion: The Making of the Western Mind

Tom Holland in conversation with Swapan Dasgupta

Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable. It was this that rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that so many people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion-an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus-had been a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history.
The emergence of Christianity is the single most transformative development in Western history. Even the increasing number in the West today who have abandoned the faith of their forebears, and dismiss all religion as pointless superstition, remain in part its heirs. Ranging in time from the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BC to the on-going migration crisis in Europe today, and from Nebuchadnezzar to the Beatles, award-winning historian Tom Holland, in conversation with Swapan Dasgupta, explores  just what it was that made Christianity so revolutionary and disruptive; how completely it came to saturate the mind-set of Latin Christendom; and why, in a West that has become increasingly doubtful of religion's claims, so many of its instincts remain irredeemably Christian.

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

The JCB Prize for Literature, founded in 2018, has quickly established benchmarks in literary excellence. In this insightful session, join members of the 2019 Jury, two of whom are well-known writers and one who is among India’s most versatile environmentalists as they discuss what makes the cut as a piece of literature.
 
Sahitya Akademi award-winning feminist Malayali writer and journalist K.R. Meera’s novel Aarachar won the prestigious Odakkuzhal Prize in 2013 and remains remains one of the highest-selling books in Malayalam. Pradip Krishen is a naturalist, environmentalist and the author-photographer of the critically acclaimed Trees of Delhi: A Field Guide. Journalist, editor and writer Parvati Sharma has authored the recent biography Jahangir: An Intimate Portrait of a Great Mughal.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Floods have ravaged India’s urban landscapes with unprecedented fury over the last decade. Mumbai, Surat, Srinagar, Chennai, Patna and cities across Kerala have all been swallowed up by floodwaters and sewage. These were not isolated, freak phenomena but signalled a larger ecological devastation. Jairam Ramesh is an economist, environmentalist, politician and author of Green Signals. Viju B’s book Flood and Fury: Ecological Devastation in the Western Ghats investigates the ecological crisis in the Western Ghats. Krupa Ge’s Rivers Remember: #ChennaiRains and the Shocking Truth of a Manmade Flood covers the catastrophic floods that ravaged Chennai in 2015.  In conversation with energy and water expert Marcus Moench, they speak of flood and fury, and how to reverse the rage of the rivers.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Anamika is the author of several award winning poetry collections and novels including Aaina Saz, deeply inspired by folk traditions and the metaphysical strains of the rebel Bhakta poets. In conversation with Nishtha Gautam, Opinion Editor at The Quint, she discusses her  books, beliefs and the core of conviction that sustains her writing practice.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ‘ikigai’ or ‘a reason to jump out of bed every morning’. The international bestseller by Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles shares the Japanese secret to a long and happy life and has helped readers around the world to find purpose, nurture friendships and throw themselves into their passions. In conversation with writer and columnist Nilanjana S. Roy, co-author Francesc Miralles joins us at the Jaipur Literature Festival to share the inspirations, learnings and tools of’ ikigai’.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Two recent biographies evoke landmark moments in time and place. Economist, author and politician Jairam Ramesh has written A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon, a compelling biography of one of India’s most controversial and consequential public figures. Award-winning journalist Samanth Subramanian is the author of A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of JBS Haldane, a portrait of the brilliant polymath and his time. In conversation with  Pallavi Raghavan, Assistant Professor at Ashoka University, they speak of the research and insights that shape their books and the importance of nuanced biography in our understanding of the recent past.

The session will be followed by the launch of Jairam Ramesh’s A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

42. She Merchants Buccaneers and Gentlewomen: British Women in India

Katie Hickman in conversation with Bee Rowlatt

Presented by Rajasthan Patrika, The Leadership Series

The first British women to set foot in India did so in the very early 17th century, two and a half centuries before the Raj. Women made their way to India for exactly the same reasons men did— to carve out a better life for themselves. In the early days, India was a place where the slates of 'blotted pedigrees' were wiped clean, bankrupts given a chance to make good and  a taste for adventure satisfied — for women. They went and worked as milliners, bakers, dress-makers, actresses, portrait painters, maids, shop-keepers, governesses, teachers, boarding house proprietors, midwives, nurses, missionaries, doctors, geologists, plant-collectors, writers, travellers and—most surprising of all —traders.
The history of the British in India has cast a long shadow over these women. ‘Memsahibs’, once a word of respect, is now more likely to be a byword for snobbery and even racism. And it is true: prejudice of every kind did cloud many aspects of British involvement in India. But was not invariably the case.
In this landmark session, celebrated chronicler Katie Hickman, in conversation with Bee Rowlatt uncovers stories, until now hidden from history. Through diaries, letters and memoirs, many still in manuscript form, this exciting book reveals the extraordinary life and times of hundreds of women who made their way across the sea and changed history.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

The condition of being a Muslim today is inevitably linked to the question of alienation and violence with the younger generation of Muslims facing a crisis of particular identity and moral reconciliation. The looming accusations of terror make young Muslims increasingly susceptible to radicalisation through the manipulation of religious feelings. Omar Ghobash’s Letters to a Young Muslim recognises this uncomfortable truth and is a personal, pertinent and poignant collection of essays, relayed through an exchange of letters between father and son. In conversation with Rakhshanda Jalil, author of You Don’t Look Like a Muslim, this timely session confronts common perceptions of Islam and reminds us of the true tenets of the faith.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was destined to be the conscience and political catalyst of his age. On the 150th anniversary of his birth, a session that searches the aspects of his legacy that have remained immutable with time. A distinguished panel, including writers and scholars Talat Ahmed and Makarand R. Paranjape alongside filmmaker Ramesh Sharma speak with feminist and human rights activist Ruchira Gupta about the enduring truths enshrined in Gandhi’s life and the teachings he bequeathed to a troubled world, as well as the distortions they have been subjected to.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Damian Barr, Arthur Japin and Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how their LGBT sexuality has affected their life and impacted on their writing in a session moderated by Vivek Tejuja
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Writing for young readers requires a leap of perception and emotional intelligence. Authors across genres who invest in communicating with the unfettered landscape of the young mind tell us of how they reach out to the child within in their creative process. Author, poet and translator Deepa Agarwal has written over 50 books, most of them for young readers. Celebrated novelist Hansda Sowvendra Shekhar has recently written Jwala Kumar and the Gift of Fire: Adventures in Champakbagh. Historian and biographer Parvati Sharma is the author of Rattu and Poorie's Adventures in History: 1857, which records an exciting and engrossing account of time travel. Author and illustrator Devangana Dash has written, illustrated and designed The Jungle Radio: Bird Songs of India, a picture book rooted in conservation and environmental storytelling. Together, they speak to writer and novelist Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan about how and why they write, the challenges and rewards of their writing.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

A series of multi-vocal poetry readings, in many moods and metres featuring writers from around the world. Themes, rhythms and poetic styles converge in a joyous celebration of the poetic imagination.
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Samvad

43. AK Ramanujan: A Poet's Diary

Guillermo Rodríguez and Krishna Ramanujan in conversation with Ranjit Hoskote

The legendary poet, folklorist, translator and scholar AK Ramanujan left an indelible mark on the understanding and appreciation of Indian literature around the world. After his premature death in 1993, Ramanujan’s personal journals, diaries and notes, referred to as the AKR Papers remained with the University of Chicago until his son Krishna Ramanujan and Guillermo Rodriguez edited them. Published as Journeys: A Poet’s Diary, they take us to the heart of the poet scholar’s vision and work. Krishna Ramanujan is a science writer at Cornell University. Guillermo Rodriguez is the Founding Director of Casa de la India and the author of When Mirrors are Windows: A View of A.K. Ramanujan’s Poetics. In conversation with poet and curator Ranjit Hoskote, they bring Ramanujan’s luminous aesthetics to life.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Samvad

Rajasthani Sahitya Akademi awardees across generations speak of the rich heritage and linguistic traditions of the state. Rajasthani finds voice in its distinctive syntax and variety of dialects – yet still awaits official recognition in the schedule of Indian languages. Chandra Prakash Deval, Raju Ram Bijarniya, Ritupriya and Madhur Acharya read and recite from their work and speak with Vishes Kothari about the unique genius of Rajasthani literature in its many moods and manifestations.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Samvad

In a world veering between dark dystopias and a new understanding of our planet and cosmos, speculative fiction provides both solace and inspiration even as it awakens primal fears. Rakesh Kaul’s recent novel, Dawn, The Warrior Princess of Kashmir, set in AD 3000, addresses a future of weaponised AI and mind-controlled automatons where stories and histories are manipulated, where men have lost their souls and all the women have been slain. All except the last princess of Kashmir, who invokes and unleashes the cosmic powers to restore the human world. Author and entrepreneurs Vineet Bajpai’s bestselling Harappa trilogy blurs the lines between history, myth and fantasy. Together, in conversation with Nishtha Gautam, the two writers speak of how the use the genre to craft compelling stories, across time portals and intersections of the past and future.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Samvad

An illuminating session on the subtle and continuing influence of the planet Saturn on our lives. Ayurvedic doctor, scholar and best selling author Robert Svoboda elaborates on the Greatness of Saturn, a powerful myth taken from the East Indian Vedic tradition, honouring the planet which personifies time, limitation, loss and adversity. In conversation with artist Abhishek Singh, they interpret the myth together and deliberate on its immense therapeutic potential to bring hope, to heal and to ultimately provide a deeper understanding of what it means to be human.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Samvad

Writers, artists and activists speak of the power of words and images, theatre and film in opening minds and hearts to societal issues. Award-winning poet and playwright Sholeh Wolpé seeks to bridge the political divide between her native Iran and her adopted Western homes through her poetry and translations of works of Iranian writers, notably Sufi poet Attar’s The Conference of the Birds. Benjamin Dix is the author of the graphic novel Vanni: A Family’s Struggle through the Sri Lankan Conflict and Founding Director of the non-profit PositiveNegatives, which produces literary comics exploring complex social and human rights issues by adapting personal testimonies into art, education and advocacy. Emmy-winning journalist and activist Ruchira Gupta is the founder of the anti-sex-trafficking organisation Apne Aap and author of Priya and The Lost Girls, which follows Priya, India’s first augmented reality female superhero who fights for women’s rights and equality. Vani Tripathi Tikoo is the youngest ever member of the Central Board of Film Certification. Her campaigns and outreach programmes have focused on encouraging women’s participation in politics as well as issues revolving around education, empowerment and employment.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Samvad

Many have hailed the widespread use of generic drugs as one of the most important public-health developments of the 21st century. Today, almost 90 percent of our pharmaceutical market is comprised of generics, the majority of which are manufactured overseas. We have been reassured by our doctors, our pharmacists and our regulators that generic drugs are identical to their brand-name counterparts, just less expensive. But is this really true?
Award-winning journalist’s Katherine Eban’s Bottle of Lies exposes the deceit behind generic-drug manufacturing and the attendant risks for global health. Drawing on exclusive accounts from whistleblowers and regulators as well as thousands of pages of confidential FDA documents, Eban reveals an industry where fraud is rampant, companies routinely falsify data, and executives circumvent almost every principle of safe manufacturing to minimize cost and maximize profit, confident in their ability to fool inspectors.
A decade-long investigation with international sweep, high-stakes brinkmanship and big money at its core, Eban, in conversation with prize winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, reveals how the world’s greatest public-health innovation has become one of its most astonishing swindles.
 

Programme 2020

24 Jan | 8:45AM - 9:00AM NEXA
Front Lawn

EkPrana: ‘The Chair is Your New Mat’

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 9:00 AM - 9:40 AM NEXA
Front Lawn

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM NEXA
Front Lawn

In a magical session that brings the music of words to life, the acclaimed vocalist Shubha Mudgal reads from and speaks her debut collection of short stories, Looking for Miss Sargam. Her book, set in the world of classical Indian music, is wry, tongue in cheek and full of deep insights and perspectives. In conversation with editor Sudha Sadanand, Mudgal tells us of the elusive Miss Sargam, of the traditions, realities and contradictions that a musician straddles and the realities that her narratives invoke.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Charbagh

An award-winning writer and broadcaster, Howard Jacobson’s novels include The Mighty Walzer, winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize, Kalooki Nights, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the highly acclaimed The Act of Love and, most recently, the Man Booker Prize 2010-winning The Finkler Question.
Here, in conversation with Chandrahas Choudhury he talks about his life in writing and his latest novel, Live a Little, a wickedly observed novel about falling in love at the end of your life. Told with Jacobson’s trademark wit and style, it  is in equal parts funny, irreverent and tender – a novel to make you consider all the paths not taken and whether you could still change course.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Mughal Tent

How do you capture your own life and that of your close family in writing? How different is memoir from the autobiographical novel? Masters of the genre Nicholas Coleridge, Åsne Seierstad, Avi Shlaim, Lemn Sissay and Madhur Jaffrey discuss the difficulty of pinning the self to paper with Chiki Sarkar.

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable. It was this that rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that so many people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion-an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus-had been a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history.
The emergence of Christianity is the single most transformative development in Western history. Even the increasing number in the West today who have abandoned the faith of their forebears, and dismiss all religion as pointless superstition, remain in part its heirs. Ranging in time from the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BC to the on-going migration crisis in Europe today, and from Nebuchadnezzar to the Beatles, award-winning historian Tom Holland, in conversation with Swapan Dasgupta, explores  just what it was that made Christianity so revolutionary and disruptive; how completely it came to saturate the mind-set of Latin Christendom; and why, in a West that has become increasingly doubtful of religion's claims, so many of its instincts remain irredeemably Christian.

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

The first British women to set foot in India did so in the very early 17th century, two and a half centuries before the Raj. Women made their way to India for exactly the same reasons men did— to carve out a better life for themselves. In the early days, India was a place where the slates of 'blotted pedigrees' were wiped clean, bankrupts given a chance to make good and  a taste for adventure satisfied — for women. They went and worked as milliners, bakers, dress-makers, actresses, portrait painters, maids, shop-keepers, governesses, teachers, boarding house proprietors, midwives, nurses, missionaries, doctors, geologists, plant-collectors, writers, travellers and—most surprising of all —traders.
The history of the British in India has cast a long shadow over these women. ‘Memsahibs’, once a word of respect, is now more likely to be a byword for snobbery and even racism. And it is true: prejudice of every kind did cloud many aspects of British involvement in India. But was not invariably the case.
In this landmark session, celebrated chronicler Katie Hickman, in conversation with Bee Rowlatt uncovers stories, until now hidden from history. Through diaries, letters and memoirs, many still in manuscript form, this exciting book reveals the extraordinary life and times of hundreds of women who made their way across the sea and changed history.
 

24 Jan | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Samvad

The legendary poet, folklorist, translator and scholar AK Ramanujan left an indelible mark on the understanding and appreciation of Indian literature around the world. After his premature death in 1993, Ramanujan’s personal journals, diaries and notes, referred to as the AKR Papers remained with the University of Chicago until his son Krishna Ramanujan and Guillermo Rodriguez edited them. Published as Journeys: A Poet’s Diary, they take us to the heart of the poet scholar’s vision and work. Krishna Ramanujan is a science writer at Cornell University. Guillermo Rodriguez is the Founding Director of Casa de la India and the author of When Mirrors are Windows: A View of A.K. Ramanujan’s Poetics. In conversation with poet and curator Ranjit Hoskote, they bring Ramanujan’s luminous aesthetics to life.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

Namita Gokhale, author and festival director, launches her new novel Jaipur Journals. Set against the backdrop of the vibrant Jaipur Literature Festival, it is partly a love letter to the ‘greatest literary show on Earth’, partly an ode to the millions of aspiring authors who wander with unsubmitted manuscripts in their bags — and in the end a tribute to that loneliest tribe of them all: the writers. In conversation with diplomat and author Shashi Tharoor alongside poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar, she discusses the themes of her new novel and how her two personas come together in it.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Charbagh

Omani writer Jokha Alharthi was awarded the Man Booker International Prize for the year 2019 for her magnificent novel Celestial Bodies.  She is the first Arabic-language winner of the prize. Originally entitled “Sayyidat al-Qamr” (“Ladies of the Moon”), this inventive, multigenerational tale is set in the fictional desert village of al-Awafi.  In conversation with Dr. Mohamed Zarrouk and Prof. Zikrur Rahman, she speaks of her novel’s exploration – through the prism of one family’s losses and loves – of Oman’s coming-of-age.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Mughal Tent

A woman’s work is never done. Indian women’s participation in the workforce is decreasing steadily, even as figures rise in the rest of the world. A deep discussion on women and work, with anecdotal insights and perspectives, to analyse current realities and ponder how to understand, respect and revive the role of women in the economic sphere. A panel of women from diverse backgrounds, including an iconic chef, an ex-marine, a social entrepreneur and a rural activist speak to journalist Namita Bhandare of the causes and consequences of the roadblocks that come in the way of women’s working lives.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

The JCB Prize for Literature, founded in 2018, has quickly established benchmarks in literary excellence. In this insightful session, join members of the 2019 Jury, two of whom are well-known writers and one who is among India’s most versatile environmentalists as they discuss what makes the cut as a piece of literature.
 
Sahitya Akademi award-winning feminist Malayali writer and journalist K.R. Meera’s novel Aarachar won the prestigious Odakkuzhal Prize in 2013 and remains remains one of the highest-selling books in Malayalam. Pradip Krishen is a naturalist, environmentalist and the author-photographer of the critically acclaimed Trees of Delhi: A Field Guide. Journalist, editor and writer Parvati Sharma has authored the recent biography Jahangir: An Intimate Portrait of a Great Mughal.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

The condition of being a Muslim today is inevitably linked to the question of alienation and violence with the younger generation of Muslims facing a crisis of particular identity and moral reconciliation. The looming accusations of terror make young Muslims increasingly susceptible to radicalisation through the manipulation of religious feelings. Omar Ghobash’s Letters to a Young Muslim recognises this uncomfortable truth and is a personal, pertinent and poignant collection of essays, relayed through an exchange of letters between father and son. In conversation with Rakhshanda Jalil, author of You Don’t Look Like a Muslim, this timely session confronts common perceptions of Islam and reminds us of the true tenets of the faith.
 

24 Jan | 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Samvad

Rajasthani Sahitya Akademi awardees across generations speak of the rich heritage and linguistic traditions of the state. Rajasthani finds voice in its distinctive syntax and variety of dialects – yet still awaits official recognition in the schedule of Indian languages. Chandra Prakash Deval, Raju Ram Bijarniya, Ritupriya and Madhur Acharya read and recite from their work and speak with Vishes Kothari about the unique genius of Rajasthani literature in its many moods and manifestations.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

Lisa Ray is one of India’s first supermodels, an actor, a mother of twins through surrogacy and a cancer-survivor. Her memoir is an unflinching and a deeply moving account of her nomadic existence, her mentors, friends, lovers, her healing and spiritual quest. In conversation with Jaipur Literature Festival producer Sanjoy K. Roy, she discusses her riveting life story.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Charbagh

Writer and TIME editor-at-large Anand Giridharadas takes on the privileged classes in his scorching new book, the bestselling Winners Take All. It investigates the global elite’s efforts to ‘change the world’ except in ways that threaten the social order and their position atop it. This searing critique of modern plutocrats who seek to do more good but never less harm is described as a call to action for elites and everyday citizens alike. A session that offers transformative perspectives to complex societal problems. In conversation with Åsne Seierstad.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Mughal Tent

The long-standing US-India ties are founded on the common principle of democracy. Each period in modern history has added fresh layers to this important relationship in the context of global security, stability, trade and investment. In 2019, ‘Howdy Modi’, a milestone community summit, was hosted by the Texas India Forum for Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Donald Trump in Houston. Over 50,000 people attended the sold-out event. In this session, the historic US-India relationship will be examined against the backdrop of newer narratives. Varghese K. George, associate editor, US correspondent and author of Open Embrace: India-US ties in the age of Modi and Trump, former foreign secretary and author of How India Sees the World: Kautilya to the 21st Century Shyam Saran, and writer and former Indian Ambassador to the United States Navtej Sarna discuss the past, present and future of relations between the world’s two biggest democracies. Jeffrey Gettleman is an American journalist who won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Floods have ravaged India’s urban landscapes with unprecedented fury over the last decade. Mumbai, Surat, Srinagar, Chennai, Patna and cities across Kerala have all been swallowed up by floodwaters and sewage. These were not isolated, freak phenomena but signalled a larger ecological devastation. Jairam Ramesh is an economist, environmentalist, politician and author of Green Signals. Viju B’s book Flood and Fury: Ecological Devastation in the Western Ghats investigates the ecological crisis in the Western Ghats. Krupa Ge’s Rivers Remember: #ChennaiRains and the Shocking Truth of a Manmade Flood covers the catastrophic floods that ravaged Chennai in 2015.  In conversation with energy and water expert Marcus Moench, they speak of flood and fury, and how to reverse the rage of the rivers.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was destined to be the conscience and political catalyst of his age. On the 150th anniversary of his birth, a session that searches the aspects of his legacy that have remained immutable with time. A distinguished panel, including writers and scholars Talat Ahmed and Makarand R. Paranjape alongside filmmaker Ramesh Sharma speak with feminist and human rights activist Ruchira Gupta about the enduring truths enshrined in Gandhi’s life and the teachings he bequeathed to a troubled world, as well as the distortions they have been subjected to.
 

24 Jan | 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Samvad

In a world veering between dark dystopias and a new understanding of our planet and cosmos, speculative fiction provides both solace and inspiration even as it awakens primal fears. Rakesh Kaul’s recent novel, Dawn, The Warrior Princess of Kashmir, set in AD 3000, addresses a future of weaponised AI and mind-controlled automatons where stories and histories are manipulated, where men have lost their souls and all the women have been slain. All except the last princess of Kashmir, who invokes and unleashes the cosmic powers to restore the human world. Author and entrepreneurs Vineet Bajpai’s bestselling Harappa trilogy blurs the lines between history, myth and fantasy. Together, in conversation with Nishtha Gautam, the two writers speak of how the use the genre to craft compelling stories, across time portals and intersections of the past and future.
 

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

The Cartiers is the revealing tale of a jewelry dynasty — four generations, from revolutionary France to the 1970s. At its heart are the three Cartier brothers whose motto was ‘Never copy, only create’ and who made their family firm internationally famous in the early days of the 20th century, thanks to their unique and complementary talents: Louis, the visionary designer who created the first men’s wristwatch to help an aviator friend tell the time without taking his hands off the controls of his flying machine; Pierre, the master dealmaker who bought the New York headquarters on Fifth Avenue for a double-stranded natural pearl necklace; and Jacques, the globe-trotting gemstone expert whose travels to India gave Cartier access to the world’s best rubies, emeralds, and sapphires, inspiring the celebrated Tutti Frutti jewelry. 

Francesca Cartier Brickell, whose great-grandfather was the youngest of the brothers, has travelled the world researching her family’s history, tracking down those connected with her ancestors and discovering long-lost pieces of the puzzle along the way. 

Now she reveals never-before-told dramas, romances, intrigues, betrayals, and more. Published in the 200th anniversary of the birth of the dynasty’s founder, Louis-François Cartier, this book is a magnificent, definitive, epic social history shown through the deeply personal lens of one legendary family.

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM Charbagh

There is a city on the western shores of India where it no longer rains...

The sea has invaded its boundaries and its inhabitants reside in a towering structure called the Bombadrome, which hovers above the barren land. Theirs is an artificially equated society; they lead technologically directed lives; they have no memory of the past. They don't remember that this place was once called Bom Bahia, or Bombay, or Mumbai.

Except for one man, the last civil servant of the India of old, a witness to the time when it all fell apart, now bitter, filled with regret and thought to be mad. For decades he has remained silent, but now a moment has come, which comes but rarely in history, that prompts him into a final act of service: To remind people of what happened all those years ago, of the events that unmade the city, then the nation, and finally their lives...

Sharp, layered and scathing, The Black Dwarves of the Good Little Bay will grab you by the scruff of your neck and force you to listen. Because the sins of the past can never be fully hidden. Because the end can never justify the means.

24 Jan | 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM Mughal Tent

The Swansea University Dylan Thomas Prize is one of the world’s biggest prizes for young writers, celebrating literary excellence and raw talent. It is awarded to the best fictional prose, poetry or drama published in English anywhere in the world by an author aged 39 or under. Established in 2006, the Prize celebrates 15 years in a discussion including
first ever winner, Rachel Trezise and latest winner, Guy Gunaratne,  along with jury member and Festival co-Director Namita Gokhale and the Prize’s Executive Officer Elaine Canning. The 2020 longlist will be announced  during the session.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

Writer, politician and public intellectual Shashi Tharoor is the award-winning author of 19 books of fiction and non-fiction. A third-term Member of Parliament, representing Thiruvananthapuram, Dr. Tharoor has served as Minister of State in the Government of India and also as Under-Secretary General of the United Nations. His unerring sense of humour lightens up the serious oeuvre of his work, which includes a powerful indictment of colonialism. His predilection for long words and telling phrases has created a sub-genre of #Tharoorisms, and his recent attempts at stand up comedy have won him a constituency of admirers. In conversation with Michael Dwyer, he speaks he speaks of the personal and the political, and the beliefs and ideas that have anchored him in his public life and literary career.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM Charbagh

With Asia at the centre of international geopolitics, an incisive session examines the players and positions amidst shifting perspectives and situations. Bruno Maçães’ recent books include The Dawn of Eurasia: On the Trail of a New World Order, an account of the coming integration of Europe and Asia. Shivshankar Menon’s latest book, Past Present: India in Asian Geopolitics, takes a long deep look at the Asian story. Deepak Nayyar is author of Resurgent Asia, which highlights development and economic transformation over the past 50 years. Together, in conversation with journalist Suhasini Haidar, they discuss and dissect Asia’s place in the new world order.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM Mughal Tent

Director, producer, lyricist and former Reliance Entertainment Chairman Amit Khanna has been part of the Indian entertainment industry’s evolution and witnessed several decades of excitement, turmoil and growth. His book, Words. Sounds. Images: A History of Media and Entertainment in India, is a first of its kind exploration of the subject, from the time of the Indus Valley Civilisation until the present. A session that searches the fascinating history of this incomparable business, with Khanna, Shobhaa De, author, columnist and founding editor of leading film and entertainment magazines, and poet Javed Akhtar.
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Anamika is the author of several award winning poetry collections and novels including Aaina Saz, deeply inspired by folk traditions and the metaphysical strains of the rebel Bhakta poets. In conversation with Nishtha Gautam, Opinion Editor at The Quint, she discusses her  books, beliefs and the core of conviction that sustains her writing practice.

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Damian Barr, Arthur Japin and Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how their LGBT sexuality has affected their life and impacted on their writing in a session moderated by Vivek Tejuja
 

24 Jan | 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM Samvad

An illuminating session on the subtle and continuing influence of the planet Saturn on our lives. Ayurvedic doctor, scholar and best selling author Robert Svoboda elaborates on the Greatness of Saturn, a powerful myth taken from the East Indian Vedic tradition, honouring the planet which personifies time, limitation, loss and adversity. In conversation with artist Abhishek Singh, they interpret the myth together and deliberate on its immense therapeutic potential to bring hope, to heal and to ultimately provide a deeper understanding of what it means to be human.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

The rich diversity of Indian democracy has negotiated difficult challenges over the years. In an era of disruption, how will its institutions and social fabric face the demands of change? If change is the only constant, how will they keep in step with the demands of the times? A conversation across disciplines and political positions that addresses the concerns of our fractured realities.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM Charbagh

Every bit as radical the name suggests, ClientEarth continues to be a necessary intervention in times of rampant ecological devastation. Comprising of a bastion of passionate and purposeful lawyers, the revolutionary non-profit law organisation has sought to represent the Earth and advocate for its interests. Martin Goodman speaks about his latest book, which charts the journey of the firm, and provides insight into the development of environmental enforcement litigation and its broader implications. A session to bring back hope, featuring eminent writers and environmentalists in conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, as they discuss our responsibility towards the Earth and discuss what it means to act planet. Martin Goodman has co-authored Client Earth with his husband James Thornton, who helms the pioneering organisation.  Politician, economist and environmentalist Jairam Ramesh has written Green Signals. American journalist David Wallace-Wells is known for his writings on climate change and has written the essay ‘The Uninhabitable Earth’, which he later expanded into the 2019 book The Uninhabitable Earth
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM Mughal Tent

Celebrated writers dissect the anatomy of the love story as they speak of friendship and celebrity, relations and the human heart as well as love, life and affluenza. Writer and entrepreneur Ravinder Singh worked with Infosys and Microsoft before personal tragedy pushed him to pen a love story that resonated with millions of readers. His latest novel, The Belated Bachelor Party, moves away from romance to celebrate friendship. Shunali Khullar Shroff’s sizzling new novel Love in the Time of Affluenza is sharp, perceptive and rib-splittingly funny. Together, in conversation with writer Divia Thani, they speak of the enduring human need for love stories and their variations on the theme.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ‘ikigai’ or ‘a reason to jump out of bed every morning’. The international bestseller by Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles shares the Japanese secret to a long and happy life and has helped readers around the world to find purpose, nurture friendships and throw themselves into their passions. In conversation with writer and columnist Nilanjana S. Roy, co-author Francesc Miralles joins us at the Jaipur Literature Festival to share the inspirations, learnings and tools of’ ikigai’.
 

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

Writing for young readers requires a leap of perception and emotional intelligence. Authors across genres who invest in communicating with the unfettered landscape of the young mind tell us of how they reach out to the child within in their creative process. Author, poet and translator Deepa Agarwal has written over 50 books, most of them for young readers. Celebrated novelist Hansda Sowvendra Shekhar has recently written Jwala Kumar and the Gift of Fire: Adventures in Champakbagh. Historian and biographer Parvati Sharma is the author of Rattu and Poorie's Adventures in History: 1857, which records an exciting and engrossing account of time travel. Author and illustrator Devangana Dash has written, illustrated and designed The Jungle Radio: Bird Songs of India, a picture book rooted in conservation and environmental storytelling. Together, they speak to writer and novelist Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan about how and why they write, the challenges and rewards of their writing.

24 Jan | 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM Samvad

Writers, artists and activists speak of the power of words and images, theatre and film in opening minds and hearts to societal issues. Award-winning poet and playwright Sholeh Wolpé seeks to bridge the political divide between her native Iran and her adopted Western homes through her poetry and translations of works of Iranian writers, notably Sufi poet Attar’s The Conference of the Birds. Benjamin Dix is the author of the graphic novel Vanni: A Family’s Struggle through the Sri Lankan Conflict and Founding Director of the non-profit PositiveNegatives, which produces literary comics exploring complex social and human rights issues by adapting personal testimonies into art, education and advocacy. Emmy-winning journalist and activist Ruchira Gupta is the founder of the anti-sex-trafficking organisation Apne Aap and author of Priya and The Lost Girls, which follows Priya, India’s first augmented reality female superhero who fights for women’s rights and equality. Vani Tripathi Tikoo is the youngest ever member of the Central Board of Film Certification. Her campaigns and outreach programmes have focused on encouraging women’s participation in politics as well as issues revolving around education, empowerment and employment.
 

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

As we begin our journey of the beautifully Indian mind, it is as if we are opening doors to the many vistas of beauty that invite us to the numerous artistic representations created by our potters and poets that beckon us and even more to the majestic truths that underpin these beautiful creations. It is through the Indian aesthetic mind and its concepts of the beautiful that the Indian civilisation can be best understood, for in that mind are pages of history and voices of the past.

This book is a journey into that charmed and beautiful mind from which has arisen concepts and ideas, forms and textures, words and music, movement and stillness.

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM Charbagh

Monsters, angels, aliens whoever they are… 

We’ll find out about them!

Chapati monsters, angels coming from the Andromeda Galaxy?!

What rubbish…

Matt Winston and his fans are truly crazy.

Why would they believe a rumour?

We’ll find out in three epic short stories in this book!

What a mysterious world we live in!

This book has the answers to the rumours spread by Matt Winston. Who is he? Find out by reading this book.

24 Jan | 4:45 PM - 5:15 PM Mughal Tent

The newest publication from Art1st and the first in the Arts Integration Series, the book concurrently explores the works of Indian artists and the joy of verbs and action words. The book takes the young reader on a journey of actions as drawn from the works of eminent Indian Artists, along with a set of engaging art and language activities. The child protagonist awakes to the wonders of a new morning, makes some friends and has a wonderful day. The concept revolved around action in art, as found in a collection of paintings made by different artists. Using various production techniques, a vibrant colour palette and an engaging and hidden activity segment on each page, the design makes it an action-packed read.

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM NEXA
Front Lawn

For our 19th century forebears, science meant progress and hope. Today, we are not so sure. With Google and Facebook harvesting our data and listening to our every conversation in the service of surveillance capitalism, with development bringing environmental catastrophe in its wake and with robots replacing more and more human jobs, we now fear science the industries associated with it as much as we look to it as a solution to our problems. Here, scientist and mathematician Marcus de Sautoy, dystopian novelist John Lanchester and Jaspreet Bindra, author of the Tech Whisperer, discuss the Cyber Future
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM Charbagh

How does one capture the life of a woman in writing? How different is the feminine biography from that of a man? Biographers Bettany Hughes, Benjamin Moser, Jung Chang, Lindsey Hilsum and Hallie Rubenhold discuss the difficulty of pinning to paper the lives of women to paper in conversation with Anita Anand.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM Mughal Tent

Diversity is both the inspiration and the glue for creativity and resilience. In a session that discusses ‘otherness’, a range of inspirational speakers from different cultures and backgrounds speak of literary diversity and the need to foreground and create visibility in the publishing ecosystem, beyond tokenism and across the spectrum of race, colour and sexual orientation. London-based writer Sunny Singh is the founder of the Jhalak Prize for a Writer of Colour. Indian-born Australian writer Roanna Gonsalves writes on themes on multi-cultural imagination recently released her debut novel Sunita De Souza Goes To Sydney. Hansda Sowendra Shekhar is the author of the JCB Prize-shortlisted My Father’s Garden, The Adivasi Will Not Dance and The Mysterious Ailment of Rupi Baskey, which won the Sahitya Akademi Yuva Puraskar. Writer Annie Zaidi’s Bread, Cement, Cactus won the prestigious Nine Dots Prize for combining memoir and reportage to explore contemporary notions of belonging. In conversation with Urvashi Butalia, co-founder of feminist publishing houses Kali for Women and Zubaan, this session brings a cross section of voices and perspectives in an important discussion on literary diversity.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM Bank Of Baroda
Baithak

Two recent biographies evoke landmark moments in time and place. Economist, author and politician Jairam Ramesh has written A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon, a compelling biography of one of India’s most controversial and consequential public figures. Award-winning journalist Samanth Subramanian is the author of A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of JBS Haldane, a portrait of the brilliant polymath and his time. In conversation with  Pallavi Raghavan, Assistant Professor at Ashoka University, they speak of the research and insights that shape their books and the importance of nuanced biography in our understanding of the recent past.

The session will be followed by the launch of Jairam Ramesh’s A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of VK Krishna Menon

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM Motwani Jadeja Foundation
Durbar Hall

A series of multi-vocal poetry readings, in many moods and metres featuring writers from around the world. Themes, rhythms and poetic styles converge in a joyous celebration of the poetic imagination.
 

24 Jan | 5:15 PM - 6:15 PM Samvad

Many have hailed the widespread use of generic drugs as one of the most important public-health developments of the 21st century. Today, almost 90 percent of our pharmaceutical market is comprised of generics, the majority of which are manufactured overseas. We have been reassured by our doctors, our pharmacists and our regulators that generic drugs are identical to their brand-name counterparts, just less expensive. But is this really true?
Award-winning journalist’s Katherine Eban’s Bottle of Lies exposes the deceit behind generic-drug manufacturing and the attendant risks for global health. Drawing on exclusive accounts from whistleblowers and regulators as well as thousands of pages of confidential FDA documents, Eban reveals an industry where fraud is rampant, companies routinely falsify data, and executives circumvent almost every principle of safe manufacturing to minimize cost and maximize profit, confident in their ability to fool inspectors.
A decade-long investigation with international sweep, high-stakes brinkmanship and big money at its core, Eban, in conversation with prize winning journalist Jeffrey Gettleman, reveals how the world’s greatest public-health innovation has become one of its most astonishing swindles.